Book Announcement: Cremation, Corpses and Cannibalism: Comparative Cosmologies and Centuries of Cosmic Consumption

Cremation, Corpses and Cannibalism: Comparative Cosmologies and Centuries of Cosmic Consumption now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443881739
Hardback, pp205, £61.99 / $104.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Cremation, Corpses and Cannibalism: Comparative Cosmologies and Centuries of Cosmic Consumption by Anders Kaliff and Terje Oestigaard.

Death matters and the matters of death are initially, and to a large extent, the decaying flesh of the corpse. Cremation as a ritual practice is the fastest and most optimal way of dissolving the corpse’s flesh, either by annihilation or purification, or a combination. Still, cremation was not the final rite, and the archaeological record testifies that the dead represented a means to other ends – the flesh, and not the least the bones – have been incorporated in a wide range of other ritual contexts. While human sacrifices and cannibalism as ritual phenomena are much discussed in anthropology, archaeology has an advantage, since the actual bone material leaves traces of ritual practices that are unseen and unheard of in the contemporary world. As such, this book fleshes out a broader and more coherent understanding of prehistoric religions and funeral practices in Scandinavia by focusing on cremation, corpses and cannibalism.
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Book Announcement: Religious Periodicals and Publishing in Transnational Contexts: The Press and the Pulpit

Religious Periodicals and Publishing in Transnational Contexts: The Press and the Pulpit now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443885201
Hardback, pp210, £61.99 / $104.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Religious Periodicals and Publishing in Transnational Contexts: The Press and the Pulpit, edited by Oliver Scheiding and Anja-Maria Bassimir.

This volume explores the interrelationship of religion and print practices, and sheds new light on the history of religious publishing in a globalizing world and its changing media consumption. Periodicals have recently become of interest to scholars in book history and religious studies, as they try to determine how magazines, journals, newsletters, and newspapers meet the diverse spiritual demands of believers conditioned by an increasingly translocal and pluralistic religious landscape in modern America and beyond. Existing publications in this field have produced new insights into the multilayered nineteenth- and twentieth-century publishing enterprises, as well as the numerous actors behind them, often crossing ethnic, gender, and national boundaries. This volume focuses instead on the socio-economic conditions, institutional organizations, action networks, and communicative environments that shape religious publishing and its medial apparatus in transnational contexts. In doing so, the authors study the material devices, business structures, and cultural networks needed for circulating words and images that nourish specific formations of religious adherence.
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Book Announcement: African Perspectives on Culture and World Christianity

African Perspectives on Culture and World Christianity now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443873314
Hardback, pp231, £61.99 / $104.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of African Perspectives on Culture and World Christianity by Joseph Ogbonnaya.

Unlike the global North, “the ferment of Christianity” in the global South, among the majority of world people, has been astronomical. Despite the shift in the center of gravity of Christianity to the global South, intra-ecclesial tensions globally remain those of the relationship of culture to religion. The questions posed revolve around to what extent Western Christianity should be adapted to local cultures. Should we talk of Christianity in non-Western contexts or of majority world Christianity? Is it appropriate to describe the shift as the emergence of global Christianity or world Christianity? Should Christianity in the global South mimic Christianity in the global North, or can it be different in the light of the diversity of these cultures? Can Africans, Asians, Latin Americans, Europeans and North Americans – the entire global community – speak of God in the same way?
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Book Announcement: Well-being, Personal Wholeness and the Social Fabric

Well-being, Personal Wholeness and the Social Fabric now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443898584
Hardback, pp385, £64.99 / $109.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Well-being, Personal Wholeness and the Social Fabric, edited by Doru Costache, Darren Cronshaw and James R. Harrison.

Well-being is a familiar term in academic literature and public discourse. It captures the imagination by addressing issues related to the social good and the quest for personal happiness. It embraces a wide variety of concerns: age, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, self-esteem, health, class, education, institution and ecosystems, among many issues. Well-being studies focus on the welfare of the world and its inhabitants, bringing holistic and transformative perspectives to bear. The Christian faith has been a powerful contributor to this tradition over the centuries. Human beings, made in the image of God, are called to live transformed lives through the Spirit of Christ in communities of grace and reconciliation for the benefit of others, caring for our planet in the expectation of God’s new creation. What difference does the study of well-being from a Christian perspective make?
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Book Announcement: New Approaches to Human Dignity in the Context of Qur’ānic Anthropology: The Quest for Humanity

New Approaches to Human Dignity in the Context of Qur’ānic Anthropology: The Quest for Humanity now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443898614
Hardback, pp285, £61.99 / $104.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of New Approaches to Human Dignity in the Context of Qur’ānic Anthropology: The Quest for Humanity, edited by Rüdiger Braun and Hüseyin I. Çiçek.

In recent years, the challenge of relating one’s own theological concept of man and his destiny to secular topics, such as the inviolability of human dignity, has generated a dynamic discourse about how Islamic anthropology can help cultivate and perfect the individual self and social ‘humanisation’. This anthology brings together contemporary Muslim and non-Muslim approaches to the secular notion of human dignity with reference to the Islamic tradition in general and the anthropology of the Qur’ān in particular.
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Book Announcement: The Bible in Music

The Bible in Music now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443873147
Hardback, pp579, £70.99 / $119.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of The Bible in Music by Robert Ignatius Letellier.

This book explores the relationship between the Bible and the world of music, an association that is recorded from ancient times in the Old Testament, and one that has continued to characterize the cultural self-expression of Western Civilization ever since. The study surveys the emergence of this close relationship in the era following the end of the Roman Empire and through the Middle Ages, taking particular note of the role of Gregorian chant, folk music and the popularity of mystery, morality and passion plays in reflection of the Sacred Scripture and its themes during those times.
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Book Announcement: A History of the Lie of Innocence in Literature: Sons Who Become Orphans

A History of the Lie of Innocence in Literature: Sons Who Become Orphans now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443872867
Hardback, pp270, £61.99 / $104.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of A History of the Lie of Innocence in Literature: Sons Who Become Orphans, edited by Pavlina Radia.

This book traces the history of what it terms the “lie of innocence” as represented in literary texts from the late 18th century to contemporary times. The writers selected here – William Blake, Herman Melville, William Faulkner, Graham Greene, and Cormac McCarthy – write at various points in which the western world was undergoing a process of secularization. This work commences with a study of the bible demonstrating the extent to which “innocence” is realized there as a lie. It identifies in the bible how “innocence” is used for political, social and ethical expediency, and suggests that the explications of each reference can be demonstrated to testify to an absence of innocence, to indeed the lie of its supposed meaning.
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