Book Announcement: Pantokrator: An Introduction to Orthodoxy (paperback)

Paperback edition of Pantokrator: An Introduction to Orthodoxy now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443886505
Paperback, pp120, £19.99 / $33.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the paperback release of Pantokrator: An Introduction to Orthodoxy by Trevor Curnow.

Although most people think of Greek philosophy as “Western”, its religion is commonly referred to as “Eastern”. For those who have not spent time in countries where Orthodox Christianity is the dominant religion, it can seem exotic and alien. Even those who visit these countries can come away with little understanding of it. Pantokrator: an Introduction to Orthodoxy helps those unfamiliar with Orthodoxy to become acquainted with the history of the Orthodox Church, what it teaches, how it is structured, and how it differs from other churches. There is also a brief guide to the architecture and internal design and decoration of Orthodox churches. Because monasticism plays an important role in the life of the Orthodox Church, an account is given of the monastic life. This is illustrated with reference to how that life is lived on Mount Athos, an enclave within Greece run entirely by monks. The history and organisation of the Holy Mountain, as Athos is called, is explained in general terms with a more detailed account of one of its monasteries, Pantokrator.
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Book Announcement: Unfashionable Objections to Islamophobic Cartoons: L’Affaire Charlie Hebdo

Unfashionable Objections to Islamophobic Cartoons: L’Affaire Charlie Hebdo now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443891240
Hardback, pp170, £58.99 / $99.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Unfashionable Objections to Islamophobic Cartoons: L’Affaire Charlie Hebdo, by Dustin J. Byrd.

On January 7, 2015, two armed men dressed in masks made their way into the offices of Charlie Hebdo, intent on killing those who had drawn derisive cartoons of Prophet Muhammad. The satirical magazine based in Paris was well-known for its mockery of politicians, right-wing extremists, racists, and religious figures, including the Pope, Jews, Christians and Muslims. Once inside, the two gunmen shot and killed twelve employees, including the magazine’s editor and cartoonist, Stéphane “Charb” Charbonnier. Although Charb often claimed to defend minorities, especially Muslims, against the rising tide of racism in France, all in the name of the French Enlightenment, he nevertheless fell victim to the dialectic of the Enlightenment, in which the Enlightenment itself is functionalized as a tool of repression. Continue reading

Book Announcement: Cremation, Corpses and Cannibalism: Comparative Cosmologies and Centuries of Cosmic Consumption

Cremation, Corpses and Cannibalism: Comparative Cosmologies and Centuries of Cosmic Consumption now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443881739
Hardback, pp205, £61.99 / $104.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Cremation, Corpses and Cannibalism: Comparative Cosmologies and Centuries of Cosmic Consumption by Anders Kaliff and Terje Oestigaard.

Death matters and the matters of death are initially, and to a large extent, the decaying flesh of the corpse. Cremation as a ritual practice is the fastest and most optimal way of dissolving the corpse’s flesh, either by annihilation or purification, or a combination. Still, cremation was not the final rite, and the archaeological record testifies that the dead represented a means to other ends – the flesh, and not the least the bones – have been incorporated in a wide range of other ritual contexts. While human sacrifices and cannibalism as ritual phenomena are much discussed in anthropology, archaeology has an advantage, since the actual bone material leaves traces of ritual practices that are unseen and unheard of in the contemporary world. As such, this book fleshes out a broader and more coherent understanding of prehistoric religions and funeral practices in Scandinavia by focusing on cremation, corpses and cannibalism.
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Book Announcement: Religious Periodicals and Publishing in Transnational Contexts: The Press and the Pulpit

Religious Periodicals and Publishing in Transnational Contexts: The Press and the Pulpit now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443885201
Hardback, pp210, £61.99 / $104.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Religious Periodicals and Publishing in Transnational Contexts: The Press and the Pulpit, edited by Oliver Scheiding and Anja-Maria Bassimir.

This volume explores the interrelationship of religion and print practices, and sheds new light on the history of religious publishing in a globalizing world and its changing media consumption. Periodicals have recently become of interest to scholars in book history and religious studies, as they try to determine how magazines, journals, newsletters, and newspapers meet the diverse spiritual demands of believers conditioned by an increasingly translocal and pluralistic religious landscape in modern America and beyond. Existing publications in this field have produced new insights into the multilayered nineteenth- and twentieth-century publishing enterprises, as well as the numerous actors behind them, often crossing ethnic, gender, and national boundaries. This volume focuses instead on the socio-economic conditions, institutional organizations, action networks, and communicative environments that shape religious publishing and its medial apparatus in transnational contexts. In doing so, the authors study the material devices, business structures, and cultural networks needed for circulating words and images that nourish specific formations of religious adherence.
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Book Announcement: African Perspectives on Culture and World Christianity

African Perspectives on Culture and World Christianity now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443873314
Hardback, pp231, £61.99 / $104.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of African Perspectives on Culture and World Christianity by Joseph Ogbonnaya.

Unlike the global North, “the ferment of Christianity” in the global South, among the majority of world people, has been astronomical. Despite the shift in the center of gravity of Christianity to the global South, intra-ecclesial tensions globally remain those of the relationship of culture to religion. The questions posed revolve around to what extent Western Christianity should be adapted to local cultures. Should we talk of Christianity in non-Western contexts or of majority world Christianity? Is it appropriate to describe the shift as the emergence of global Christianity or world Christianity? Should Christianity in the global South mimic Christianity in the global North, or can it be different in the light of the diversity of these cultures? Can Africans, Asians, Latin Americans, Europeans and North Americans – the entire global community – speak of God in the same way?
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Book Announcement: Well-being, Personal Wholeness and the Social Fabric

Well-being, Personal Wholeness and the Social Fabric now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443898584
Hardback, pp385, £64.99 / $109.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Well-being, Personal Wholeness and the Social Fabric, edited by Doru Costache, Darren Cronshaw and James R. Harrison.

Well-being is a familiar term in academic literature and public discourse. It captures the imagination by addressing issues related to the social good and the quest for personal happiness. It embraces a wide variety of concerns: age, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, self-esteem, health, class, education, institution and ecosystems, among many issues. Well-being studies focus on the welfare of the world and its inhabitants, bringing holistic and transformative perspectives to bear. The Christian faith has been a powerful contributor to this tradition over the centuries. Human beings, made in the image of God, are called to live transformed lives through the Spirit of Christ in communities of grace and reconciliation for the benefit of others, caring for our planet in the expectation of God’s new creation. What difference does the study of well-being from a Christian perspective make?
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