Book Review: ‘And there’ll be NO dancing’: Perspectives on Policies Impacting Indigenous Australia since 2007

‘And there’ll be NO dancing’: Perspectives on Policies Impacting Indigenous Australia since 2007 has been reviewed in the the Pacific Journalism Review by Dr Bonita Mason of Curtin University, Perth. A sharp and incisive review, it is available here (requires subscription), and an indicative excerpt is below:

“The 14 chapters present a well-structured, readable and compre­hensive collection of case studies fo­cused on the Intervention or the forces and conditions that helped to create it. They are written for an interna­tional readership, and present a range of disciplines and fields—history, land rights, law, human rights, journalism, literature, film, art, sport, education, post-colonial studies and disability. The book shows how past interventions have consistently failed to meet their objectives and made the circumstances of the Indigenous peoples subjected to them worse.”


For this month only, we are offering a huge 50% discount on this book and three of our other latest titles in indigenous studies. Please click here to find out more, and to access the discount code to receive the half-price reduction.

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Call for Chapters: Engaging Non Governmental Organizations and Actors in Sustainable Development

Dr Sana Moid is seeking chapters for an edited collection entitled Engaging Non Governmental Organizations and Actors in Sustainable Development, which will be published by Cambridge Scholars Publishing. The deadline for submissions is August 15th 2018. Continue reading

Book review: Behind the Words: The FCO, Hegemonolingualism and the End of Britain’s Freedom

In this book, the author laments the decline of the use of Standard English in the Foreign Office in the quest for diversity or the misapprehension that it is somehow connected to ‘class’. Using original texts, the book demonstrates how FCO English has deteriorated in the last thirty years, owing to a combination of political correctness, globalisation, the proliferation of emails, Twitter, Blairism, and, most especially, management speak (the author gives some toe-curling examples of the latter). Mallinson claims this lack of clarity is to blame for Britain’s failure to get its message across, which goes hand in hand with its diminishing influence in the world.

Password Magazine (41), p.22.


Behind the Words: The FCO, Hegemonolingualism and the End of Britain’s Freedom is available in a newly issued paperback from Cambridge Scholars for only £29.99. Please click here to purchase it.

Three treatises by William Mallinson

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office Association’s Password magazine has published a short overview of William Mallinson’s three 2016 books with us: Thrice a Stranger: Penelope’s Eastern Mediterranean OdysseyKissinger and the Invasion of Cyprus: Diplomacy in the Eastern Mediterranean, and The Threat of Geopolitics to International Relations: Obsession with the Heartland.

William Mallinson

All three books were released in paperback in 2017, and can be purchased from £29.99 on our website.

Mallinson’s newest book, entitled Images in Words: Only History Exists, is out now, and can be purchased in hardback directly from Cambridge Scholars here.

Book Review: An Anatomy of an English Radical Newspaper

What is a newspaper? What are the different roles that newspapers have played in the past and what role(s) should they play today? Recent changes in the media landscape have led to a renewed interest in these questions. But the English term newspaper has always been somewhat misleading. The French term journal is suggestive of a unit of time (the day) but lacks explicit reference to the material form of the publication or its subject matter. The English term brings both to the surface: news-paper. Today the paper part of the term may seem like a reminder of another era in which physical newspapers were delivered to doorsteps, unfolded and refolded in Tube carriages, and left on public benches for the next person to enjoy or discard. News is increasingly encountered on computer screens, smart phones, and tablets. At many times in the past, however, it was arguably the news part of the term that could have seemed inadequate. The definition of news may be elusive, but it is clear that newspapers have almost never been limited to accounts of recent events. In eighteenth-century Britain and North America, newspapers contained letters to the printer on various subjects, as well as excerpts from books, official notices, and advertisements (which often took up most of the first page). In the nineteenth century, poems, short stories, and serial novels took on prominence in many newspapers, increasing their interest for readers. At other times, such as the British Isles in the 1640s and the United States in the 1790s, newspapers have aligned themselves with particular factions or advocated specific causes. The fact that such newspapers intervened in politics makes them all the more important to study, as Laurent Curelly’s book on The Moderate (1648-49) reveals. At that time the preferred term was newsbook rather than newspaper. Most news periodicals of the 1640s were short quarto pamphlets rather than the larger folios that later came to dominate English journalism. The form and content of news publications has varied significantly over time, and it is only by closely examining individual examples that we can begin to understand what role newspapers (or newsbooks or whatever else they were called) have played at different moments in the past.

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