Book Announcement: Brief Forms in Medieval and Renaissance Hispanic Literature

Brief Forms in Medieval and Renaissance Hispanic Literature now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443891394
Hardback, pp220, £61.99 / $104.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Brief Forms in Medieval and Renaissance Hispanic Literature, edited by Barry Taylor and Alejandro Coroleu.

The studies gathered in this volume engage in different ways with the ideas of André Jolles (1874–1946), whose Einfache Formen (“Simple Forms”) was first published in 1930. Trained as an anthropologist, Jolles argued that these “simple” forms – Legende (legend), Sage (saga), Mythe (myth), Rätsel (riddle), Spruch (proverb), Kasus (case), Memorabile (memorable action), Märchen (folk or fairy tale) and Witz (joke or witticism) – which had circulated at a very early stage of human culture underlay the more sophisticated genres of literature. Unlike epic or tragedy, many of the simple forms are not theorised in classical rhetoric. The essays presented here focus on their reception in Hispanic culture from the Middle Ages to circa 1650. As such, the book will be of interest to scholars of medieval and early modern Spanish, Catalan and Latin literature. It will also appeal to historians of Humanismm as well as scholars working on classical and Renaissance literary theory. Continue reading

Book Announcement: Hamlet’s Age and the Earl of Southampton

Hamlet’s Age and the Earl of Southampton now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443891431
Hardback, pp165, £58.99 / $99.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Hamlet’s Age and the Earl of Southampton by Lars Kaaber.

Hamlet’s Age and the Earl of Southampton investigates the exact age of the eponymous prince in Shakespeare’s play, a topic which has been subject to frequent debates over the past 239 years. Whether Hamlet is sixteen, eighteen or, as the Gravedigger states in Act V, thirty years old may seem irrelevant to performances of the play (since actors tackling the part are very rarely in their teens), but it still tends to influence our general view of the Danish prince. Romantic criticism in the early 19th century insisted on a heroic and supremely intelligent teenage prince, and, to a large extent, this view of Hamlet still prevails. Whether Shakespeare meant his protagonist to be the irreproachable prince of Romantic fancy, however, remains a question. Continue reading

Meet our Authors: Dimitrios Kassis – August 2017

Dimitrios Kassis holds a PhD from the Faculty of English Studies of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. His doctoral thesis was entitled Representations of the North in Victorian Travel Literature, published in 2015. He has received a Master’s degree in Education Studies (with Distinction) from Roehampton University in London.

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Book Announcement: The Medusa Gaze in Contemporary Women’s Fiction: Petrifying, Maternal and Redemptive

The Medusa Gaze in Contemporary Women’s Fiction: Petrifying, Maternal and Redemptive now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443891486
Hardback, pp299, £61.99 / $104.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of The Medusa Gaze in Contemporary Women’s Fiction: Petrifying, Maternal and Redemptive, edited by Adriana Teresa Damascelli.

This book offers striking insights into the desires and frustrations of women through the narratives of impressive contemporary novelists. Crafting its analysis on the gaze as presented by Lacan and Sartre, the book demonstrates how the subject creates her own ego against her alter egos or hostile others in the mirrors facing her, offering insight into women’s powers and weaknesses. The first two mirroring chapters trace the women stalking its pages under a panoptic gaze, as they learn how to revert their look defiantly back onto others. Some win assurance through their own assertive gaze; others are stared down, reduced to psychic trauma, madness and even suicide beneath the demeaning force of the looks of others. Continue reading

Book Announcement: Translation, the Canon and its Discontents: Version and Subversion

Translation, the Canon and its Discontents: Version and Subversion now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443895620
Hardback, pp210, £61.99 / $104.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Translation, the Canon and its Discontents: Version and Subversion, edited by Miguel Ramalhete Gomes.

This collection addresses the complex process by which translation and other forms of rewriting have contributed to canon formation, revision, destabilization, and dismantlement. Through the play between version and subversion, which is inherent to any form of rewriting, these essays – focusing on translations since the sixteenth century down to the present day – stress the role of translation and adaptation as potentially transformative mediations, capable of shaping and undermining identities. Such manipulation is deeply ambivalent, since it can be used as a means of disseminating the ideology of oppressive regimes at the expense of the source text; but it can also serve to garner attention to marginalised texts. This tense interplay between political, social, and aesthetic purposes almost inevitably generates discontents, which may turn out to be the outcome of translation in general. However, discontent is a relational concept, depending on where one stands in the field of competing positions that is the canon. Continue reading

Book Announcement: De-constructing Dahl (paperback)

Paperback edition of De-constructing Dahl now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443882583
Paperback, pp205, £34.99 / $59.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the paperback release of De-constructing Dahl by William Mallinson.

This is the first single-authored monograph on Roald Dahl since 1994. Remarkably, in spite of Dahl’s commercial success, and the divided opinions he generates, very little scholarly work on the author has been produced.
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Book Announcement: Fictional Portrayals of Spain’s Transition to Democracy: Transitional Fantasies

Fictional Portrayals of Spain’s Transition to Democracy: Transitional Fantasies now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443895743
Hardback, pp140, £58.99 / $99.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Fictional Portrayals of Spain’s Transition to Democracy: Transitional Fantasies by Anne L. Walsh.

This manuscript looks at a selection of narratives published in Spain during the transition to democracy and compares them with more recent publications. The main focus here is how fiction brings an extra dimension to the recreation of the past, by adding imagination to historical fact. One effect of this is to challenge readers or spectators to question the effect the reliability of the narrator has on conviction about the events told. By using a specific moment in time, Spain’s Transition, it will be seen that memory, history and imagination all blend together to create very different stories, but all are linked with the idea that the past will always haunt the present and actions from the past will have far-reaching consequences. Texts analysed here include work by Javier Cercas, Eduardo Mendoza, Manuel Vázquez Montalbán, Rosa Montero, Arturo Pérez-Reverte, and Gonzalo López Alba, as well as episodes from two popular TV series, Cuéntame cómo pasó and Protagonistas de la Transición. Continue reading