Book review: Behind the Words: The FCO, Hegemonolingualism and the End of Britain’s Freedom

In this book, the author laments the decline of the use of Standard English in the Foreign Office in the quest for diversity or the misapprehension that it is somehow connected to ‘class’. Using original texts, the book demonstrates how FCO English has deteriorated in the last thirty years, owing to a combination of political correctness, globalisation, the proliferation of emails, Twitter, Blairism, and, most especially, management speak (the author gives some toe-curling examples of the latter). Mallinson claims this lack of clarity is to blame for Britain’s failure to get its message across, which goes hand in hand with its diminishing influence in the world.

Password Magazine (41), p.22.


Behind the Words: The FCO, Hegemonolingualism and the End of Britain’s Freedom is available in a newly issued paperback from Cambridge Scholars for only £29.99. Please click here to purchase it.

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Book Review: Metonymy and Word-Formation: Their Interactions and Complementation

The book Metonymy and Word-Formation: Their Interactions and Complementation  by Mario Brdar examines numerous ways in which metonymy and word formation interact and complement each other. They both play a very important role in enriching vocabulary. However, both processes have been marginalized to some extent: word-formation in grammar and metonymy in cognitive linguistics. Continue reading

Editorial Advisory Board’s ‘Recommended Read’ – April 2018

This April, our Editorial Advisory Board member Professor Zeinab Ibrahim has chosen her ‘Recommended Read’: one of our best-selling titles, and increasingly recognised for its contribution to the field. Zeinab is Teaching Professor of Arabic Studies at Carnegie Mellon University-Qataris and a world-renowned expert on the sociolinguistics of Arabic, especially as it relates to teaching Arabic as a native or foreign language. She has published several books in this field, including Beyond Lexical Variation in Modern Standard Arabic with Cambridge Scholars Publishing in 2009. Continue reading

Book Review: An Anatomy of an English Radical Newspaper

What is a newspaper? What are the different roles that newspapers have played in the past and what role(s) should they play today? Recent changes in the media landscape have led to a renewed interest in these questions. But the English term newspaper has always been somewhat misleading. The French term journal is suggestive of a unit of time (the day) but lacks explicit reference to the material form of the publication or its subject matter. The English term brings both to the surface: news-paper. Today the paper part of the term may seem like a reminder of another era in which physical newspapers were delivered to doorsteps, unfolded and refolded in Tube carriages, and left on public benches for the next person to enjoy or discard. News is increasingly encountered on computer screens, smart phones, and tablets. At many times in the past, however, it was arguably the news part of the term that could have seemed inadequate. The definition of news may be elusive, but it is clear that newspapers have almost never been limited to accounts of recent events. In eighteenth-century Britain and North America, newspapers contained letters to the printer on various subjects, as well as excerpts from books, official notices, and advertisements (which often took up most of the first page). In the nineteenth century, poems, short stories, and serial novels took on prominence in many newspapers, increasing their interest for readers. At other times, such as the British Isles in the 1640s and the United States in the 1790s, newspapers have aligned themselves with particular factions or advocated specific causes. The fact that such newspapers intervened in politics makes them all the more important to study, as Laurent Curelly’s book on The Moderate (1648-49) reveals. At that time the preferred term was newsbook rather than newspaper. Most news periodicals of the 1640s were short quarto pamphlets rather than the larger folios that later came to dominate English journalism. The form and content of news publications has varied significantly over time, and it is only by closely examining individual examples that we can begin to understand what role newspapers (or newsbooks or whatever else they were called) have played at different moments in the past.

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World Poetry Day 2018 – Cambridge Scholars Publishing

This month, we are pleased to support World Poetry Day, which takes place every year on 21st March. This day was first adopted by UNESCO in 1999, and while many countries celebrate their own national or international poetry days, World Poetry Day has the aim of “supporting linguistic diversity through poetic expression and increasing the opportunity for endangered languages to be heard”.

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