Book Announcement: Samuel Beckett and Europe: History, Culture, Tradition

Samuel Beckett and Europe: History, Culture, Tradition now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443896306
Hardback, pp193, £58.99 / $99.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Samuel Beckett and Europe: History, Culture, Tradition, edited by Michela Bariselli, Niamh M. Bowe and William Davies.

Drawing on the diverse critical debates of the ‘Beckett and Europe’ conference held in Reading, UK, in 2015, this volume brings together a selection of essays to offer an international response to the central question of what ‘Europe’ might mean for our understandings of the work of Samuel Beckett. Ranging from historical and archival work to the close interrogation of language and form, from the influences of various national literary traditions on Beckett’s writing to his influence on the work of other writers and thinkers, this book examines the question of Europe from multiple vantage points so as to reflect the ways in which Beckett’s oeuvre both challenges and enlivens his status as a ‘European writer’. With a full introductory chapter examining the challenging implications of the term ‘Europe’ in the contemporary period, this volume treats Europe as a recognition of the multiple ways that Beckett’s poetry, criticism, prose and drama invite new understandings of the role of history, culture and tradition in one of the most significant bodies of writing of the twentieth century. Continue reading

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Book Review: Reflections on Persian Grammar Developments in Persian Linguistic Scholarship I

Reflections on Persian Grammar: Developments in Persian Linguistic Scholarship I by Dr. A. Soheili is an analysis of the way the Persian grammar description has developed. It is a concise presentation of the most conspicuous stages in its development. Reviewing the grammar description literature and analyzing it in light of modern grammar theories, the book distinguishes itself as the first historical survey of such scholarly work on Persian grammars. From among ca. 2500 treatises and grammar books on Persian, the author has selected around 40 works to illustrate the main progress in the description of the Persian language, which is a very small proportion of the references available. The criterion used in this selection is, principally, the representativity of the work for each developmental period.

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Book Announcement: The Modern Philosopher, Letters to Her Son and Verses on the Siege of Gibraltar, by Elizabeth Craven

The Modern Philosopher, Letters to Her Son and Verses on the Siege of Gibraltar, by Elizabeth Craven now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443895040
Hardback, pp142, £58.99 / $99.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of The Modern Philosopher, Letters to Her Son and Verses on the Siege of Gibraltar, by Elizabeth Craven, edited by Julia Gasper.

This book offers a modern edition of three fascinating and important works by Elizabeth Craven (1750-1828), an English author who lived for many years on the Continent. Craven is mainly remembered for her scandalous personal life, but deserves more serious attention. She was influenced by Enlightenment ideas and took a broad interest in the events of her time. The Modern Philosopher (1790) is a satire on the egalitarian theories of the French Revolution. The intellectual Longinius advocates equality in theory as perfectly logical, but is dismayed when his household put it into practice. Its love-plot has a happy ending. Written originally in French, it is here translated for the first time. Continue reading

Book Review: Plotting the Rushdie-verse

Venturing to chart out the territory traversed, discovered, and marked by a prolific writer like Salman Rushdie – whose artistic and political expressions not only range across genres and disciplines, but also remain at the heart of innumerable critical debates and discussions – calls for a project characterised by the rigour and precision of a cartographic mission. Mapping out the Rushdie Republic: Some Recent Surveys, edited by Tapan Kumar Ghosh and Prasanta Bhattacharyya, takes on this exciting and undeniably arduous task which certainly caters to both scholars who are well-versed in Rushdie and beginners who await their initiation. This comprehensive collection of essays and articles on Rushdie’s works brings into its purview an array of perspectives from eminent stalwarts (who are known for their various commentary on Rushdie, or on post/colonial, post/modern, Indian/English literatures, and so on) alongside newer critics/scholars emerging on the grid of literary and academic topologies. An extensive introduction written by one of the editors (Bhattacharyya), and a substantially revealing interview with a major critic of Rushdie (Timothy Brennan), methodically plots out the premises along the lines of which the anthology unravels as a significant appendage to the steadily expanding field of studies on Rushdie.

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Book Announcement: Peter Pan and the Mind of J. M. Barrie: An Exploration of Cognition and Consciousness (Paperback)

Paperback edition of Peter Pan and the Mind of J. M. Barrie: An Exploration of Cognition and Consciousness now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443895101
Paperback, pp205, £34.99 / $59.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the paperback release of Peter Pan and the Mind of J. M. Barrie: An Exploration of Cognition and Consciousness by Rosalind Ridley.

What is Peter Pan all about? Many of us realise that there is a bit more to the stories than a simple fantasy about flying away to a wonderful place in which to play, and that there is something psychologically rather dark about the events in the stories. But J. M. Barrie’s work has not previously been considered from the perspective of either the science of his time, or the insights of modern cognitive psychology. This book explores the texts of Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens (1906) and Peter and Wendy (1911), and argues that Barrie describes the limited mental abilities of infants and animals in order to illuminate the structure of human adult cognition. Barrie had a well-informed, post-Darwinian perspective on the biological origins of human behaviour. The idea that human consciousness, cognition, culture and sense of moral responsibility could have origins in animal behaviour was deeply shocking to the nineteenth century intelligentsia, and remains controversial in some sections of academia even today. Barrie’s work contains many insights into what is now referred to as mental representation and theory of mind, areas of cognitive psychology that have been examined scientifically only in the last few decades. Barrie also reflects on the nature of consciousness in a way that parallels modern interests. As books with a complex scientific undercurrent, Barrie’s Peter Pan stories rank alongside Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland and Alice through the Looking Glass, which engage with complex issues of mathematics and logic, and Charles Kingsley’s The Water-Babies, which explores the implications of evolution for human society.
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Book Announcement: Street Literature of the Long Nineteenth Century: Producers, Sellers, Consumers

Street Literature of the Long Nineteenth Century: Producers, Sellers, Consumers now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443894999
Hardback, pp387, £64.99 / $109.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Street Literature of the Long Nineteenth Century: Producers, Sellers, Consumers, edited by David Atkinson and Steve Roud.

For centuries, street literature was the main cheap reading material of the working classes: broadsides, chapbooks, songsters, prints, engravings, and other forms of print produced specifically to suit their taste and cheap enough for even the poor to buy. Street literature long held its own by catering directly for the ordinary people, at a price they could afford, but, by the end of the Victorian era, it was in terminal decline and was rapidly being replaced by a host of new printed materials in the shape of cheap newspapers and magazines, penny dreadful novels, music hall songbooks, and so on, all aimed squarely at the burgeoning mass market. Continue reading