Book Announcement: Humans and the Environment in Northern Baikal Siberia During the Late Pleistocene

Humans and the Environment in Northern Baikal Siberia During the Late Pleistocene now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443882774
Hardback, pp356, £64.99 / $109.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Humans and the Environment in Northern Baikal Siberia During the Late Pleistocene by E.M. Ineshin and A.V. Tetenkin.

The site of Bol’shoy Yakor’ I is one of the most intensively investigated Late Pleistocene sites in Eastern Siberia. This volume compiles and presents the outcome of more than three decades of research by the authors in English for the first time.  Continue reading

Book Announcement: Essays on Benjamin Britten from a Centenary Symposium

Essays on Benjamin Britten from a Centenary Symposium now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

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Hardback, pp340, £64.99 / $109.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Essays on Benjamin Britten from a Centenary Symposium, edited by David Forrest, Quinn Patrick Ankrum, Stacey Jocoy and Emily Ahrens Yates.

Coming to terms with Britten’s music is no easy task. The complex, often contradictory language associated with Britten’s style likely stems from his double interest in progressive composition and immediate connection with a broad, popular audience – an apparent paradox in the splintered musical culture of the 20th century – as well as from complicated truths in his own life, such as his love for a country that accepted neither his sexuality nor his politics. As a result, the attempt to describe his music can tell us as much about our own biases and the inadequacies of our analytic tools as it does about the music itself. Such audits of our scholarly language and strategies are vital in light of the still-murky view we have of twentieth century music. This opportunity for academic self-reflection is the reason Britten studies such as this book are so important. The essays included here challenge assumptions about musical constructs, relationships between text and music, and the influences of age, spirituality, and personal relationships on compositional technique. Continue reading

Book Announcement: Public Health and Social Reforms in Portugal (1780-1805)

Public Health and Social Reforms in Portugal (1780-1805) now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443886161
Hardback, pp325, £64.99 / $109.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Public Health and Social Reforms in Portugal (1780-1805) by Laurinda Abreu.

This monograph provides an innovative analysis of a unique period for social and public health policy in Portuguese history. With a firm basis in archival research, the book examines a lesser-known facet of one of the most fascinating and controversial figures in the late Ancien Regime in Portugal: Diogo Inácio de Pina Manique, the Intendant-General of Police from 1780 to 1805. By combining the resources of the Intendancy with those of the Casa Pia, an institution for welfare provision and social control that he set up just a month after being appointed, Pina Manique attempted to introduce a variety of projects designed to create a prosperous, healthy, well-educated, informed, clean and hard-working country less inclined to vice and immorality, in which the people would be obedient and the upper classes more magnanimous. One of his greatest achievements was perhaps to understand the link between ill health and poverty and therefore to regard public health as a key area of governance.
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Book Announcement: The Admiralty Sessions, 1536-1834: Maritime Crime and the Silver Oar

The Admiralty Sessions, 1536-1834: Maritime Crime and the Silver Oar now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443881784
Hardback, pp291, £61.99 / $105.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of The Admiralty Sessions, 1536-1834: Maritime Crime and the Silver Oar by Gregory Durston.

The growth in England and Britain’s merchant marine from the medieval period onwards meant that an increasing number of criminal offences were committed on or against the country’s vessels while they were at sea. Between 1536 and 1834, such crimes were determined at the Admiralty Sessions if brought to trial. This was a special part of the wider Admiralty Court, which, unlike the other forums in that tribunal, used English common law procedure rather than Roman civil law to try its cases. To a modest extent, this produced a ‘hybrid’ court, dominated by the common law but influenced by aspects of Europe’s other major legal tradition. The Admiralty Sessions also had their own (highly singular) regime for executing convicts, used the Marshalsea prison to hold their suspects and displayed the Admiralty Court’s ceremonial silver oar at their hearings and hangings.
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Meet our Authors: Alain Kerhervé – June 2017

Alain Kerhervé is Professor in English Studies at the University of Western Brittany, France. He is the director of the HCTI research laboratory, based at the university, and a member of the Société d’Etudes anglo-américaines des XVIIe et XVIIIe siècles. He wrote a book on Mary Delany (1700-1788), published by L’Harmattan in 2004, edited Mary Delany’s court letters (Pickering-Chatto, 2015) and completed several book projects with Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

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Book Announcement: The Faustus Myth in the English Novel

The Faustus Myth in the English Novel now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443882842
Hardback, pp135, £58.99 / $99.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of The Faustus Myth in the English Novel by Şeyda Sivrioğlu.

The Faustus myth, before being identified as a myth, was the folktale of a man named Faustus who lived in Germany. Underneath the popularity of this myth lies the basic human instinct to trespass the limits of traditional knowledge in pursuit of self-definition, authentic knowledge and power. This search and transgression also involve the desire to exercise the right of making free authentic choices. Faustus represents universal issues that are relevant for all human beings, which explains the reason why he has acquired mythic stature. Indeed, a most persistent myth has evolved, the appeal of which has led one writer after the other to reshape it.
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Book Announcement: Reflections on Medieval and Renaissance Thought

Reflections on Medieval and Renaissance Thought now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443886123
Hardback, pp200, £58.99 / $99.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Reflections on Medieval and Renaissance Thought, edited by Darci N. Hill.

The collection of articles gathered in this volume grew naturally and spontaneously out of the Second International Conference on Medieval and Renaissance Thought hosted by Sam Houston State University in April 2016. This anthology reflects the diverse fields of study represented at the conference. The purpose of the conference, and consequently of this book of essays, is partially to establish a place for medieval and renaissance scholarship to thrive in our current intellectual landscape. This volume is not designed solely for scholars, but also for generalists who wish to augment their knowledge and appreciation of an array of disciplines; it is an intellectual smorgasbord of philosophy, poetry, drama, popular culture, linguistics, art, religion, and history.
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