Book Announcement: Brief Forms in Medieval and Renaissance Hispanic Literature

Brief Forms in Medieval and Renaissance Hispanic Literature now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443891394
Hardback, pp220, £61.99 / $104.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Brief Forms in Medieval and Renaissance Hispanic Literature, edited by Barry Taylor and Alejandro Coroleu.

The studies gathered in this volume engage in different ways with the ideas of André Jolles (1874–1946), whose Einfache Formen (“Simple Forms”) was first published in 1930. Trained as an anthropologist, Jolles argued that these “simple” forms – Legende (legend), Sage (saga), Mythe (myth), Rätsel (riddle), Spruch (proverb), Kasus (case), Memorabile (memorable action), Märchen (folk or fairy tale) and Witz (joke or witticism) – which had circulated at a very early stage of human culture underlay the more sophisticated genres of literature. Unlike epic or tragedy, many of the simple forms are not theorised in classical rhetoric. The essays presented here focus on their reception in Hispanic culture from the Middle Ages to circa 1650. As such, the book will be of interest to scholars of medieval and early modern Spanish, Catalan and Latin literature. It will also appeal to historians of Humanismm as well as scholars working on classical and Renaissance literary theory. Continue reading

Book Announcement: Varian Studies Volume Three: A Varian Symposium

Varian Studies Volume Three: A Varian Symposium now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443895767
Hardback, pp440, £67.99 / $114.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Varian Studies Volume Three: A Varian Symposium, edited by Leonardo de Arrizabalaga y Prado.

Heliogabalus and Elagabalus are names given since late antiquity to the mythical or legendary avatar of Varius Avitus Bassianus. Varius was Roman emperor AD 218–222, ruling as Marcus Aurelius Antoninus. He was simultaneously High Priest of the Syrian sun god Elagabal. Heliogabalus and Elagabalus, names derived from Elagabal, are often used as misnomers for Varius himself, but more properly designate his avatar, who is far better known than Varius. The Varian avatar, under these and other names, survives and thrives in historiography, as well as in more avowedly creative literature, music, dance, the visual arts, and popular culture. Continue reading

Book Review: Macedonia: A Voyage through History (Vols. 1 & 2)

Macedonia: A Voyage through History from Michael Palairet offers a detailed, extensive overview of the history of Macedonia. In this rather ambitious project, Palairet attempts to discuss the historical developments on the territory of Macedonia covering the entire history staring from ancient times and the first organization of life on this territory to the Macedonian independence and the most contemporary developments. This makes the monograph a very important contribution to the state of art since it is one of the rare academic works in English which analyzes and discusses the historical developments on the territory of Macedonia.

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Book Announcement: Fictional Portrayals of Spain’s Transition to Democracy: Transitional Fantasies

Fictional Portrayals of Spain’s Transition to Democracy: Transitional Fantasies now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443895743
Hardback, pp140, £58.99 / $99.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Fictional Portrayals of Spain’s Transition to Democracy: Transitional Fantasies by Anne L. Walsh.

This manuscript looks at a selection of narratives published in Spain during the transition to democracy and compares them with more recent publications. The main focus here is how fiction brings an extra dimension to the recreation of the past, by adding imagination to historical fact. One effect of this is to challenge readers or spectators to question the effect the reliability of the narrator has on conviction about the events told. By using a specific moment in time, Spain’s Transition, it will be seen that memory, history and imagination all blend together to create very different stories, but all are linked with the idea that the past will always haunt the present and actions from the past will have far-reaching consequences. Texts analysed here include work by Javier Cercas, Eduardo Mendoza, Manuel Vázquez Montalbán, Rosa Montero, Arturo Pérez-Reverte, and Gonzalo López Alba, as well as episodes from two popular TV series, Cuéntame cómo pasó and Protagonistas de la Transición. Continue reading

Book Announcement: Breaking with Convention in Italian Art

Breaking with Convention in Italian Art now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443895026
Hardback, pp175, £58.99 / $99.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Breaking with Convention in Italian Art, edited by Julia C. Fischer.

Popularized by the hit television show, the phrase “breaking bad” is defined in urban slang as someone who challenges convention, defies authority, or rejects moral and social norms. Running from 2008 to 2013 on AMC, Breaking Bad featured one of the most unforgettable characters in television history: Walter White, a high school chemistry teacher, husband, and father, who is diagnosed with terminal cancer. For five seasons, fans watched as Walter White tried to secure financial security for his family by using his chemistry skills to manufacture drugs. Throughout the series’ run, Walter White was the epitome of the phrase “breaking bad”, as he broke the law and continually rejected the social mores that he had dutifully followed until his cancer diagnosis. Continue reading

Book Announcement: Laughter and War: Humorous-Satirical Magazines in Britain, France, Germany and Russia 1914–1918 (paperback)

Paperback edition of Laughter and War: Humorous-Satirical Magazines in Britain, France, Germany and Russia 1914–1918 now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443886864
Paperback, pp293, £34.99 / $59.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the paperback release of Laughter and War: Humorous-Satirical Magazines in Britain, France, Germany and Russia 1914–1918 by Lesley Milne.

War is no laughing matter. During a war, however, laughter can play a vital role in sustaining morale, both in the armies at the Front and in their homelands. Among wars, the 1914–18 conflict has left a haunting legacy, and remains a central topic in modern European history. This book offers a comparative study of the impact of the war in four countries, and breaks new ground by exploring this through the medium of what their respective populations laughed at. By searching the pages of four humorous-satirical magazines, Punch in the UK, Le Rire (France), Simplicissimus (Germany), and Novy Satirikon (Russia), all of which supported the national war efforts, it examines the ways in which humour made an important contribution to the propaganda war.
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Book Announcement: Pantokrator: An Introduction to Orthodoxy (paperback)

Paperback edition of Pantokrator: An Introduction to Orthodoxy now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443886505
Paperback, pp120, £19.99 / $33.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the paperback release of Pantokrator: An Introduction to Orthodoxy by Trevor Curnow.

Although most people think of Greek philosophy as “Western”, its religion is commonly referred to as “Eastern”. For those who have not spent time in countries where Orthodox Christianity is the dominant religion, it can seem exotic and alien. Even those who visit these countries can come away with little understanding of it. Pantokrator: an Introduction to Orthodoxy helps those unfamiliar with Orthodoxy to become acquainted with the history of the Orthodox Church, what it teaches, how it is structured, and how it differs from other churches. There is also a brief guide to the architecture and internal design and decoration of Orthodox churches. Because monasticism plays an important role in the life of the Orthodox Church, an account is given of the monastic life. This is illustrated with reference to how that life is lived on Mount Athos, an enclave within Greece run entirely by monks. The history and organisation of the Holy Mountain, as Athos is called, is explained in general terms with a more detailed account of one of its monasteries, Pantokrator.
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