Book Announcement: Quakerism, Its Legacy, and Its Relevance for Gandhian Research

Quakerism, Its Legacy, and Its Relevance for Gandhian Research now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781527500105
Hardback, pp332, £64.99 / $109.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Quakerism, Its Legacy, and Its Relevance for Gandhian Research by Satish Sharma.

This elaborate book explores Quakerism, its legacy, and its relevance for Gandhian research. The topics covered here include the historical circumstances, conditions, and thought that led to the birth of Quakerism; the seeds and history of the movement; the themes, principles, and practices of the sect; and the aid, change, reform, and conciliation efforts Quakers made to make people, communities, and nations more tolerant, problem-free, and united. As such, the book will appeal to scholars, planners, policy-makers, and practitioners concerned with the boundaries of liberties, freedoms, pacifism, peace, and justice across people, communities, and nations. Continue reading

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Book Announcement: The Modern Philosopher, Letters to Her Son and Verses on the Siege of Gibraltar, by Elizabeth Craven

The Modern Philosopher, Letters to Her Son and Verses on the Siege of Gibraltar, by Elizabeth Craven now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443895040
Hardback, pp142, £58.99 / $99.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of The Modern Philosopher, Letters to Her Son and Verses on the Siege of Gibraltar, by Elizabeth Craven, edited by Julia Gasper.

This book offers a modern edition of three fascinating and important works by Elizabeth Craven (1750-1828), an English author who lived for many years on the Continent. Craven is mainly remembered for her scandalous personal life, but deserves more serious attention. She was influenced by Enlightenment ideas and took a broad interest in the events of her time. The Modern Philosopher (1790) is a satire on the egalitarian theories of the French Revolution. The intellectual Longinius advocates equality in theory as perfectly logical, but is dismayed when his household put it into practice. Its love-plot has a happy ending. Written originally in French, it is here translated for the first time. Continue reading

Book Announcement: The Process of Politicization: How Much Politics Does a Society Need?

The Process of Politicization: How Much Politics Does a Society Need? now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443896283
Hardback, pp322, £64.99 / $109.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of The Process of Politicization: How Much Politics Does a Society Need?, edited by Wiesław Wacławczyk and Adam Jarosz.

The problem signalled in the title of this volume is of utmost importance today. While envisioning a completely depoliticised society requires a big leap of imagination, there can still be doubts as to the degree to which modern societies may or should be politicised in different dimensions. This book gives a range of answers to this question using selected examples from modern history and the present time, and it outlines the process of politicising the society, together with the tools and means used for that. It does not attempt an exhaustive coverage of the topic of politicisation but serves as a reference for persons interested in the discussed issues, including students of political and social sciences. Continue reading

Book Announcement: Palaeoart of the Ice Age

Palaeoart of the Ice Age now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443895170
Hardback, pp260, £61.99 / $104.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Palaeoart of the Ice Age by Robert G. Bednarik.

The many hundreds of books and thousands of academic papers on the topic of Pleistocene (Ice Age) art are limited in their approach because they deal only with the early art of southwestern Europe. This is the first book to offer a comprehensive synthesis of the known Pleistocene palaeoart of six continents, a phenomenon that is in fact more numerous and older in other continents. It contemplates the origins of art in a balanced manner, based on reality rather than fantasies about cultural primacy. Its key findings challenge most previous perceptions in this field and literally re-write the discipline. Despite the eclectic format and its high academic standards, the book addresses the non-specialist as well as the specialist reader. It presents a panorama of the rich history of palaeoart, stretching back more than twenty times as long in time as the cave art of France and Spain. This abundance of evidence is harnessed in presenting a new hypothesis of how early humans began to form and express constructs of reality and thus created the ideational world in which they existed. It explains how art-producing behaviour began and the origins of how humans relate to the world consciously. Continue reading

Book Announcement: Street Literature of the Long Nineteenth Century: Producers, Sellers, Consumers

Street Literature of the Long Nineteenth Century: Producers, Sellers, Consumers now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443894999
Hardback, pp387, £64.99 / $109.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Street Literature of the Long Nineteenth Century: Producers, Sellers, Consumers, edited by David Atkinson and Steve Roud.

For centuries, street literature was the main cheap reading material of the working classes: broadsides, chapbooks, songsters, prints, engravings, and other forms of print produced specifically to suit their taste and cheap enough for even the poor to buy. Street literature long held its own by catering directly for the ordinary people, at a price they could afford, but, by the end of the Victorian era, it was in terminal decline and was rapidly being replaced by a host of new printed materials in the shape of cheap newspapers and magazines, penny dreadful novels, music hall songbooks, and so on, all aimed squarely at the burgeoning mass market. Continue reading

500th Anniversary of the Reformation – Cambridge Scholars Publishing

This month, Cambridge Scholars is marking the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, a major event in the 16th century that left an indelible mark on not only the landscape in Europe but also further afield. The Reformation is considered to have begun with the publication of Martin Luther’s ‘Ninety-five Theses’ in Wittenberg, Germany, which most believe to have been on 31st October, 1517.

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Book Announcement: Early Modern Ethnic and Religious Communities in Exile

Early Modern Ethnic and Religious Communities in Exile now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443895804
Hardback, pp397, £64.99 / $109.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Early Modern Ethnic and Religious Communities in Exile, edited by Yosef Kaplan.

In the Early Modern period, the religious refugee became a constant presence in the European landscape, a presence which was felt, in the wake of processes of globalization, on other continents as well. During the religious wars, which raged in Europe at the time of the Reformation, and as a result of the persecution of religious minorities, hundreds of thousands of men and women were forced to go into exile and to restore their lives in new settings. In this collection of articles, an international group of historians focus on several of the significant groups of minorities who were driven into exile from the sixteenth to the eighteenth centuries. The contributions here discuss a broad range of topics, including the ways in which these communities of belief retained their identity in foreign climes, the religious meaning they accorded to the experience of exile, and the connection between ethnic attachment and religious belief, among others. Continue reading