Dr Mary Honan given a civic reception honouring her scholarly work on peace, justice, and reconciliation

We are delighted to share news that Dr Mary Honan, author of The Literary Representation of World War II Childhood: Interrogating the Concept of Hospitality, published with Cambridge Scholars in 2017, was honoured with a civic reception recognising “her outstanding academic research on race & ethnic relations, peace & reconciliation” (see here for more details).

Mary’s speech at the reception can be viewed here, and her book with Cambridge Scholars can be purchased by clicking here.

 

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Daring Dynasty: Custom, Conflict and Control in Early-Tudor England at the Institute of Historical Research blog

Mark R. Horowitz’s new book Daring Dynasty: Custom, Conflict and Control in Early-Tudor England has been discussed on the Institute of Historical Research’s blog here 

The book can be purchased in paperback directly from Cambridge Scholars for only £29.99 – please click here if you would like to buy it.

National Maritime Day – Cambridge Scholars Publishing

This month we are happy to be marking National Maritime Day, which takes place in the United States on the 22nd of May each year. This commemorative day was created by Congress in 1933 to mark the American steamship Savannah’s crossing of the Atlantic Ocean to England in 1819, the first time a ship had ever done so powered by steam propulsion. Today, National Maritime Day marks not only this historic event, but also the continuing role played by the maritime and shipping industries in America’s security and prosperity. Continue reading

Three treatises by William Mallinson

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office Association’s Password magazine has published a short overview of William Mallinson’s three 2016 books with us: Thrice a Stranger: Penelope’s Eastern Mediterranean OdysseyKissinger and the Invasion of Cyprus: Diplomacy in the Eastern Mediterranean, and The Threat of Geopolitics to International Relations: Obsession with the Heartland.

William Mallinson

All three books were released in paperback in 2017, and can be purchased from £29.99 on our website.

Mallinson’s newest book, entitled Images in Words: Only History Exists, is out now, and can be purchased in hardback directly from Cambridge Scholars here.

Giacomo Meyerbeer: A Critical Life and Iconography

This reviewer suspects that most Meyerbeer ‘opera buffs’, will be familiar with a basic outline of his life and the dating of the openings of his main grand operas. The author goes further and embraces much of Meyerbeer’s less well known music. But there is so much more in this very fine biography, whose scholarship is immediately apparent from Letellier’s consideration of his sources. This is a Critical Life, which has to take account of the music for which he dedicated his life, but also the man.

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Featured Review – The Quest for Streetcar Unionism in the Carolina Piedmont, 1919–1922

At Cambridge Scholars, we are very proud that many of our authors and their publications are critically acclaimed by eminent scholars in their respective fields. We put our authors at the centre of everything we do, and this month we would like to take this opportunity to highlight a particularly noteworthy review.

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Book Review: An Anatomy of an English Radical Newspaper

What is a newspaper? What are the different roles that newspapers have played in the past and what role(s) should they play today? Recent changes in the media landscape have led to a renewed interest in these questions. But the English term newspaper has always been somewhat misleading. The French term journal is suggestive of a unit of time (the day) but lacks explicit reference to the material form of the publication or its subject matter. The English term brings both to the surface: news-paper. Today the paper part of the term may seem like a reminder of another era in which physical newspapers were delivered to doorsteps, unfolded and refolded in Tube carriages, and left on public benches for the next person to enjoy or discard. News is increasingly encountered on computer screens, smart phones, and tablets. At many times in the past, however, it was arguably the news part of the term that could have seemed inadequate. The definition of news may be elusive, but it is clear that newspapers have almost never been limited to accounts of recent events. In eighteenth-century Britain and North America, newspapers contained letters to the printer on various subjects, as well as excerpts from books, official notices, and advertisements (which often took up most of the first page). In the nineteenth century, poems, short stories, and serial novels took on prominence in many newspapers, increasing their interest for readers. At other times, such as the British Isles in the 1640s and the United States in the 1790s, newspapers have aligned themselves with particular factions or advocated specific causes. The fact that such newspapers intervened in politics makes them all the more important to study, as Laurent Curelly’s book on The Moderate (1648-49) reveals. At that time the preferred term was newsbook rather than newspaper. Most news periodicals of the 1640s were short quarto pamphlets rather than the larger folios that later came to dominate English journalism. The form and content of news publications has varied significantly over time, and it is only by closely examining individual examples that we can begin to understand what role newspapers (or newsbooks or whatever else they were called) have played at different moments in the past.

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