CSP author Shahnaz Shoro provides guest lecture at WEN February meeting

Cambridge Scholars author Dr Shahnaz Shoro was honoured to provide the guest lecture at the last monthly meeting of the Writers and Editors Network (WEN), an organization dedicated to encouraging and promoting the art and skill of writing and editing. It aims to foster literacy and to assist, empower and provide moral support to writers and editors from all disciplines.

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The Historical Enigma of the Snake Woman from Antiquity to the 21st Century

Angela Giallongo’s book The Historical Enigma of the Snake Woman offers an excitingly thought-provoking evaluation of the snake woman coursing through history, particularly the Gorgon Medusa, while encapsulating hybrid creatures like Mélusine, Echidna, the Furies or Erinyes, the Hydra and the Basilisk. Giallongo draws her readers through a captivating trail of history, mythology, philosophy, literature and narrative to show how such creatures came to represent woman as the Other, through her deathly gaze and serpentine locks.

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Meet our Authors: Arundhati Bhattacharyya – December 2017

Dr Arundhati Bhattacharyya is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at Diamond Harbour Women’s University in West Bengal, India. She is an alumna of Presidency College, Kolkata (now Presidency University) and Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, and she obtained her PhD from the University of Calcutta.

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Book Review: African Women Writers and the Politics of Gender

Sadia Zulfiqar’s African Women Writers and the Politics of Gender offers a deep insight into the marginalized status of African women, their resistance to patriarchal structures in their communities, and their opposition to Eurocentric forms of feminism. Zulfiqar navigates difficult terrains to proffer solutions to the lack of an adequate agency for African women. She supports new platforms created by new female African writers, and she adequately historicizes the gender battle in the African literary canon. She does so, so impeccably; not from a position of inferiority, but from a high pedestal by reclaiming and reconstructing the identity of African women through the narration of Leila Aboulela, Mariama Ba, Buchi Emecheta, Chimamanda Adichie, and Tsitsi Dangarembga. She attempts to decenter male hegemony in the African literary sphere by affirming that African women are creators of African oral literature rather than perpetuators of it.

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Book Review: Daughters of the Nile: Egyptian Women Changing Their World

This could also have been subtitled, “Egyptian women out in the world,” since more than half of the subjects are not living in their native land. This tome is a kind of scrapbook or victory lap if you will of thirty-seven high-achieving Egyptian women in the business, public-service, and academic domains writing brief sketches of their lives. The proceeds of the book are being donated to charity and it doesn’t claim to be a scientific study of Egyptian female achievers, so we can’t judge it too harshly. Nevertheless, a reading of the book brings to light several common characteristics of these women and some noteworthy statistics.

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Book Announcement: Spanish and Latin American Women’s Crime Fiction in the New Millennium: From Noir to Gris

Spanish and Latin American Women’s Crime Fiction in the New Millennium: From Noir to Gris now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781527500167
Hardback, pp179, £58.99 / $99.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Spanish and Latin American Women’s Crime Fiction in the New Millennium: From Noir to Gris, edited by Nancy Vosburg and Nina L. Molinaro.

Crime fiction written by women in Spain and Latin America since the late 1980s has been successful in shifting attention to crimes often overlooked by their male counterparts, such as rape and sexual battery, domestic violence, child pornography, pederasty, and incest. In the twenty-first century, social, economic, and political issues, including institutional corruption, class inequality, criminalized oppression of immigrant women, crass capitalist market forces, and mediatized political and religious bodies, have at their core a gendered dimension. The conventions of the original noir, or novela negra, genre have evolved, such that some women authors challenge the noir formulas by foregrounding gender concerns while others imagine new models of crime fiction that depart drastically from the old paradigms. This volume, highlighting such evolution in the crime fiction genre, will be of interest to students, teachers, and scholars of crime fiction in Latin America and Spain, to those interested in crime fiction by women, and to readers familiar with the sub-genres of crime fiction, which include noir, the thriller, the police procedural, and the “cozy” novel. Continue reading

Book Announcement: A Companion to the English Version of J. Liébault’s Treatise on the Diseases of Women: MS Hunter 303

A Companion to the English Version of J. Liébault’s Treatise on the Diseases of Women: MS Hunter 303 now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443895002
Hardback, pp464, £67.99 / $114.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of A Companion to the English Version of J. Liébault’s Treatise on the Diseases of Women: MS Hunter 303 by Soluna Salles Bernal.

Jean Liébault (1535–1596), a doctor of medicine and an agronomist born in Dijon, contributed to the emergence of modern gynaecology by rescuing the Hippocratic medical tradition that recognized the specificity of the female body. His main work, a comprehensive treatise devoted to describing and treating the diseases of women, was highly influential in French gynaecology, being published several times. Continue reading