Book Announcement: Depicting Dante in Anglo-Italian Literary and Visual Arts: Allegory, Authority and Authenticity

Depicting Dante in Anglo-Italian Literary and Visual Arts: Allegory, Authority and Authenticity now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443899352
Hardback, pp220, £52.99 / $90.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Depicting Dante in Anglo-Italian Literary and Visual Arts: Allegory, Authority and Authenticity by Christoph Lehner.

In the course of 750 years, Dante Alighieri has been made into a universally important icon deeply engrained in the world’s cultural memory. This book examines key stages of Dante’s appropriation in Western cultural history by exploring the intermedial relationship between Dante’s Divina Commedia, the tradition of his iconography, and selected historical, literary and artistic responses from British artists in the 19th and 20th centuries. The images and iconographies created out of Dantean appropriations almost always centre around the triad of allegory, authority and authenticity. These three important aspects of revisiting Dante are found in the Dantean image fostered in Florence in the 14th and 15th centuries and feature prominently in the works of Dante Gabriel Rossetti, T. S. Eliot and Tom Phillips. Their appropriation of Dante represents landmarks in the productive reception of the Florentine, and is invariably linked to a tradition of Dante studies established in Britain during the middle of the 19th century. Continue reading

Book Announcement: Monuments and Site-Specific Sculpture in Urban and Rural Space

Monuments and Site-Specific Sculpture in Urban and Rural Space now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443851794
Hardback, pp232, £61.99 / $104.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Monuments and Site-Specific Sculpture in Urban and Rural Space, edited by Inbal Ben-Asher Gitler.

Monuments and Site-Specific Sculpture in Urban and Rural Space presents a collection of essays discussing works of art whose formal qualities, content and spatial interactions expand our idea of creation and commemoration. By addressing projects that range from war memorials to commemorations of individuals, as well as works that engage real and virtual environments, this book brings to light new aspects concerning twentieth and twenty-first century monuments and site-specific sculpture. The book addresses the work of, among others, Günter Demnig, Michael Heizer, Thomas Hirschhorn, Dani Karavan, Costantino Nivola, Melissa Shiff and John Craig Freeman, Robert Smithson, and Micha Ullman. A lucid, thought-provoking discussion of creative processes and the discourse between site-specific sculpture and its publics is provided in this collection. As such, it is vital and indispensable for historians, art historians and artists, as well as for every reader interested in the interrelations of art, urban and rural spaces, community and the makings of memory.
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Book Review: The Performance of Trauma in Moving Image Art

Dirk de Bruyn’s book is a bold and original piece of in-depth, sustained research that brings together two areas have never been brought into relationship in this way, at this length. On the one hand, there is the lineage of experimental audiovisual work. (I personally dislike the visual-centric term ‘moving image art’ – sound has been around for a while now! – but each person chooses their own label, wisely or not.) The span here goes from avant-garde cinema beginning in the 1920s through to digital media work today. And on the other hand, we have the psychological, neurological, psychotherapeutic and psychoanalytic studies of how trauma (or more accurately, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder/PTSD) affects brain functions, memory, sense experience and the general constitution of the human person. The book (adapted from a 2011 PhD) has been around for two years now, but has yet to receive the attention and discussion it richly deserves. Thanks to a badly (and often lazily) managed academic book market, too many good film tomes fall into this same oblivion today.

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Book Announcement: Emblems and Impact: Von Zentrum und Peripherie der Emblematik (2 vols.)

Emblems and Impact: Von Zentrum und Peripherie der Emblematik (Volumes I & II) now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443851848
Hardback, pp650, £80.99 / $137.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Emblems and Impact: Von Zentrum und Peripherie der Emblematik (Volumes I & II), edited by Ingrid Hoepel and Simon McKeown.

The art of the emblem is a pan-European phenomenon which developed in Western and Central Europe in the early modern period. It adopted meanings and motifs from Antiquity and the Middle Ages as part of a general humanistic impulse. Technological developments in printing that permitted the combination of letterpress with woodblock, and later copperplate, images, ensured that the emblem spread rapidly by way of printed collections. With time, emblematic ideas moved beyond Europe, conveying their insights and wisdom in the compact form of the book. These same books came to influence artists and designers working in the decoration of buildings, furniture, and household items, so that emblems entered personal life; they infiltrated festive culture, too. In such environments beyond the book, emblems were transported, adapted, and embedded in new functional contexts shaped by social, political, or religious conditions, but also by architectonical and regional art historical parameters. The results of these transformations are often of an intricate and complex meaning. The combination of word and image that constitutes the emblem still has resonance in contemporary art and architecture. Continue reading

Book Announcement: Seeking God in the Works of T. S. Eliot and Michelangelo

Seeking God in the Works of T. S. Eliot and Michelangelo now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443843904
Hardback, pp297, £52.99 / $90.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Seeking God in the Works of T. S. Eliot and Michelangelo by Harry Eiss.

Do I dare disturb the universe? It is a question recognized by people around the world. If typed into the internet, hundreds of examples appear. Many know that it comes from one of the best known poems of the twentieth century, T. S. Eliot’s The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock. What many do not know is that Eliot dramatically shifted his views at the height of his fame for writing such dark poetry as this and his also famous The Wasteland, becoming a sincere, devoted Christian. While his poetry is famous because it expresses the loss of a spiritual center in European civilization, a careful reading of it reveals that he was struggling with his Christianity from the beginning, not rejecting it, but trying to make it fit into the contemporary world. If a reader works through his love song for all of the esoteric meanings, as he demands, it quickly becomes evident that he intended it as a struggle between agape, amour and eros. Beginning it with a quote from Dante forces that into place. Though the protestant forms of Christianity have changed their views on these, the Roman Catholic holds fast. Continue reading

Book Announcement: Helen Kemp Frye’s Writings on Art

Helen Kemp Frye’s Writings on Art now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443836593
Hardback, pp115, £45.99 / $78.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Helen Kemp Frye’s Writings on Art, edited by Robert D. Denham.

Helen Kemp Frye (1910–1986) was an accomplished artist and musician, and she was also the wife of the distinguished Canadian literary critic, Northrop Frye. During the 1940s and 1950s, she played an important role in art education, particularly with the programs at the Art Gallery of Toronto, and even more particularly with art education for children. Her writings on art, collected in this volume, give voice to a very creative individual whose contributions to the cultural life of Ontario are in danger of being forgotten. Continue reading