Book Announcement: Hamlet’s Age and the Earl of Southampton

Hamlet’s Age and the Earl of Southampton now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443891431
Hardback, pp165, £58.99 / $99.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Hamlet’s Age and the Earl of Southampton by Lars Kaaber.

Hamlet’s Age and the Earl of Southampton investigates the exact age of the eponymous prince in Shakespeare’s play, a topic which has been subject to frequent debates over the past 239 years. Whether Hamlet is sixteen, eighteen or, as the Gravedigger states in Act V, thirty years old may seem irrelevant to performances of the play (since actors tackling the part are very rarely in their teens), but it still tends to influence our general view of the Danish prince. Romantic criticism in the early 19th century insisted on a heroic and supremely intelligent teenage prince, and, to a large extent, this view of Hamlet still prevails. Whether Shakespeare meant his protagonist to be the irreproachable prince of Romantic fancy, however, remains a question. Continue reading

Book Announcement: Theatre Theory and Performance: A Critical Interrogation

Theatre Theory and Performance: A Critical Interrogation now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443895729
Hardback, pp115, £58.99 / $99.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Theatre Theory and Performance: A Critical Interrogation by Siddhartha Biswas.

Over the last few centuries, the world as we know it has seen remarkable change and the arts – including theatre – have faced new challenges. Theatre is now no longer a simple point of entertainment laced with instruction or dissent, but is perceived as a more collaborative idea that looks at ever-changing paradigms. All over the world, theatre now is a dynamic process that simultaneously retains tradition and delves into extreme experimentations. This book represents a starting point for a much-needed critical interrogation. It looks at the constant features of European theatre and brings in some Indian elements, positing both in their respective locations, as well as looking at the symbiosis that has been functioning for some time. Continue reading

Book Announcement: The Israeli Defence Forces’ Representation in Israeli Cinema: Did David Betray His Soldiers?

The Israeli Defence Forces’ Representation in Israeli Cinema: Did David Betray His Soldiers? now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443891189
Hardback, pp260, £61.99 / $104.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of The Israeli Defence Forces’ Representation in Israeli Cinema: Did David Betray His Soldiers?, by Fiammetta Martegani.

Of all the Biblical heroes, the character of King David is perhaps the most paradoxical and also the most difficult to grasp. He is the Biblical Man for all seasons: a warrior, a lover, a poet, a killer and a restorer. This elaborate and fascinating archetypal hero influenced and inspired the representation of the Israeli soldier in Israeli media, art and cinema, from the establishment of the State of Israel until the present day. Continue reading

In focus: New book chronicles 100 years of filming in Jamaica

A new book documenting the international movie industry filming in Jamaica was released earlier this month and hopes to share the history of Jamaica as a destination for filming. In the book, “Jamaica, the Land of Film,” author Peter Polack chronicles all of the mainstream films from the early 1900’s to present, that used the island nation’s setting as the go-to place to shoot a movie in the Caribbean.

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Book Announcement: Arthur Miller’s Century: Essays Celebrating the 100th Birthday of America’s Great Playwright

Arthur Miller’s Century: Essays Celebrating the 100th Birthday of America’s Great Playwright now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443886482
Hardback, pp255, £61.99 / $104.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Arthur Miller’s Century: Essays Celebrating the 100th Birthday of America’s Great Playwright, edited by Stephen Marino.

Arthur Miller was one of the major American dramatists of the twentieth century, clearly ranking with other truly great American playwrights, including Eugene O’Neill, Tennessee Williams, and Edward Albee. The centennial of Miller’s birth in New York City on October 17, 1915 was celebrated around the world with a panoply of staged productions, theatrical events, media documentaries, and academic conferences. Continue reading

Book Announcement: Jamaica, the Land of Film

Jamaica, the Land of Film now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443889919
Hardback, pp230, £61.99 / $104.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Jamaica, the Land of Film, by Peter Polack.

If Jamaica were an actor she would have appeared in more than one hundred and forty-one films. The list of movies where the name Jamaica plays a prominent part is probably closer to two hundred.

This book chronicles over one hundred years of international film making in Jamaica from 1910, and provides many previously unpublished details of locations, actors and directors.

As such, Jamaica, the Land of Film provides a comprehensive history which will be of great interest to all cinema aficionados and fans of Caribbean history. Continue reading

Book Announcement: Rewriting Shakespeare’s Plays For and By the Contemporary Stage

Rewriting Shakespeare’s Plays For and By the Contemporary Stage now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443882804
Hardback, pp195, £58.99 / $99.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Rewriting Shakespeare’s Plays For and By the Contemporary Stage, edited by Michael Dobson and Estelle Rivier-Arnaud.

Why have contemporary playwrights been obsessed by Shakespeare’s plays to such an extent that most of the canon has been rewritten by one rising dramatist or another over the last half century? Among other key figures, Edward Bond, Heiner Müller, Carmelo Bene, Arnold Wesker, Tom Stoppard, Howard Barker, Botho Strauss, Tim Crouch, Bernard Marie Koltès, and Normand Chaurette have all put their radical originality into the service of adapting four-century-old classics. The resulting works provide food for thought on issues such as Shakespearean role-playing, narrative and structural re-shuffling. Across the world, new writers have questioned the political implications and cultural stakes of repeating Shakespeare with and without a difference, finding inspiration in their own national experiences and in the different ordeals they have undergone.
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