Book Announcement: Ethnic Diversity and Solidarity: A Study of their Complex Relationship

Ethnic Diversity and Solidarity: A Study of their Complex Relationship now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443881715
Hardback, pp203, £61.99 / $104.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Ethnic Diversity and Solidarity: A Study of their Complex Relationship, edited by Paul de Beer and Ferry Koster.

Ethnic diversity and solidarity are often thought to be at odds with each other. In an increasingly diverse society, individuals find it more difficult to identify with other citizens and, therefore, are less willing to show solidarity. Empirical tests of the relationship between diversity and solidarity are, however, inconclusive. Continue reading

Book Announcement: Cremation, Corpses and Cannibalism: Comparative Cosmologies and Centuries of Cosmic Consumption

Cremation, Corpses and Cannibalism: Comparative Cosmologies and Centuries of Cosmic Consumption now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443881739
Hardback, pp205, £61.99 / $104.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Cremation, Corpses and Cannibalism: Comparative Cosmologies and Centuries of Cosmic Consumption by Anders Kaliff and Terje Oestigaard.

Death matters and the matters of death are initially, and to a large extent, the decaying flesh of the corpse. Cremation as a ritual practice is the fastest and most optimal way of dissolving the corpse’s flesh, either by annihilation or purification, or a combination. Still, cremation was not the final rite, and the archaeological record testifies that the dead represented a means to other ends – the flesh, and not the least the bones – have been incorporated in a wide range of other ritual contexts. While human sacrifices and cannibalism as ritual phenomena are much discussed in anthropology, archaeology has an advantage, since the actual bone material leaves traces of ritual practices that are unseen and unheard of in the contemporary world. As such, this book fleshes out a broader and more coherent understanding of prehistoric religions and funeral practices in Scandinavia by focusing on cremation, corpses and cannibalism.
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Book Announcement: Values, World Society and Modelling Yearbook 2015

Values, World Society and Modelling Yearbook 2015 now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443881753
Hardback, pp335, £64.99 / $109.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Values, World Society and Modelling Yearbook 2015 by Gordon Burt.

The Values, World Society and Modelling Yearbook 2015, like the 2014 Yearbook, analyses contemporary world events with special attention to values, drawing on foundational ideas in a variety of academic disciplines. World society in 2015 exhibited economic, political and cultural tensions: growth and austerity; the Greek bailout referendum; the Paris attacks on the Charlie Hebdo cartoonists; the Christian south and Muslim north in the Nigerian elections; and religion and secularism in Ireland’s referendum on same-sex marriage. Demographics, austerity, migration and nationalism were all issues in the UK general election. There were debates about immigration into Europe and debates about Western military intervention. There were debates about the Enlightenment surrounding the bicentenary of the Battle of Waterloo.
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Book Announcement: Postgraduate Voices in Punk Studies: Your Wisdom, Our Youth

Postgraduate Voices in Punk Studies: Your Wisdom, Our Youth now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443881685
Hardback, pp180, £58.99 / $99.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Postgraduate Voices in Punk Studies: Your Wisdom, Our Youth, edited by Mike Dines and Laura Way.

This volume represents the first academic collection to draw upon postgraduate research in exploring the punk scene. Cutting-edge studies, spanning both local and global contexts, are covered with contributions from a range of academic disciplines, including art and design, sociology, cultural studies, English, and music. The chapters are loosely focused around three themes: scenes; gender, “race” and sexuality; and therapy and laughter. The collection builds upon, and diversifies, existing academic work in punk studies covering such topics as “whitestraightboy” hegemony, straight-edge in France, CRT and the links between punk and the “rave” scene of the 1990s.
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Book Announcement: Taking Stance in English as a Lingua Franca: Managing Interpersonal Relations in Academic Lectures

Taking Stance in English as a Lingua Franca: Managing Interpersonal Relations in Academic Lectures now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443886383
Hardback, pp230, £61.99 / $105.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Taking Stance in English as a Lingua Franca: Managing Interpersonal Relations in Academic Lectures by Maicol Formentelli.

English is undoubtedly the lingua franca of global communication today, and plays a major role in the internationalisation of universities, where it is increasingly being used as the medium of instruction. The use of English as a Lingua Franca (ELF) in higher education has spread at different speeds throughout Europe over recent decades, with Nordic and central-western countries leading the way and the regions of southern Europe lagging behind. In Italy, English-taught programmes are a rather new and emerging phenomenon which needs to be empirically investigated to uncover the complex mechanisms of classroom interaction in this foreign language.
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Book Announcement: Iranian Women in the Memoir: Comparing Reading Lolita in Tehran and Persepolis (1) and (2)

Iranian Women in the Memoir: Comparing Reading Lolita in Tehran and Persepolis (1) and (2) now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443882767
Hardback, pp230, £61.99 / $104.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Iranian Women in the Memoir: Comparing Reading Lolita in Tehran and Persepolis (1) and (2) by Emira Derbel.

This book investigates the various reasons behind the elevation of the memoir, previously categorized as a marginalized form of life writing that denudes the private space of women, especially in Western Asian countries such as Iran. Through a comparative investigation of Azar Nafisi’s Reading Lolita in Tehran and Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis (1) and (2), the book examines the way both narrative and graphic memoirs offer possibilities for Iranian women to reclaim new territory, transgress a post-traumatic revolution, and reconstruct a new model of womanhood that evades socio-political and religious restrictions. Exile is conceptualized as empowering rather than a continued status of loss and disillusionment, and the liminality of both women writers turns into a space of artistic production.
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Book Announcement: Rewriting Shakespeare’s Plays For and By the Contemporary Stage

Rewriting Shakespeare’s Plays For and By the Contemporary Stage now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443882804
Hardback, pp195, £58.99 / $99.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Rewriting Shakespeare’s Plays For and By the Contemporary Stage, edited by Michael Dobson and Estelle Rivier-Arnaud.

Why have contemporary playwrights been obsessed by Shakespeare’s plays to such an extent that most of the canon has been rewritten by one rising dramatist or another over the last half century? Among other key figures, Edward Bond, Heiner Müller, Carmelo Bene, Arnold Wesker, Tom Stoppard, Howard Barker, Botho Strauss, Tim Crouch, Bernard Marie Koltès, and Normand Chaurette have all put their radical originality into the service of adapting four-century-old classics. The resulting works provide food for thought on issues such as Shakespearean role-playing, narrative and structural re-shuffling. Across the world, new writers have questioned the political implications and cultural stakes of repeating Shakespeare with and without a difference, finding inspiration in their own national experiences and in the different ordeals they have undergone.
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