Book Review: Intercultural Geopoetics in Kenneth White’s Open World

A strange kind of predestination seems to have presided over the writing of this book on Kenneth White and Geopoetics. Its author, Mohammed Hashas, is an ex-student of Professor Khalid Haji, who was himself a student under Kenneth White at the Sorbonne.

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Book Review: Reflections on Persian Grammar Developments in Persian Linguistic Scholarship I

Reflections on Persian Grammar: Developments in Persian Linguistic Scholarship I by Dr. A. Soheili is an analysis of the way the Persian grammar description has developed. It is a concise presentation of the most conspicuous stages in its development. Reviewing the grammar description literature and analyzing it in light of modern grammar theories, the book distinguishes itself as the first historical survey of such scholarly work on Persian grammars. From among ca. 2500 treatises and grammar books on Persian, the author has selected around 40 works to illustrate the main progress in the description of the Persian language, which is a very small proportion of the references available. The criterion used in this selection is, principally, the representativity of the work for each developmental period.

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Book Review: Plotting the Rushdie-verse

Venturing to chart out the territory traversed, discovered, and marked by a prolific writer like Salman Rushdie – whose artistic and political expressions not only range across genres and disciplines, but also remain at the heart of innumerable critical debates and discussions – calls for a project characterised by the rigour and precision of a cartographic mission. Mapping out the Rushdie Republic: Some Recent Surveys, edited by Tapan Kumar Ghosh and Prasanta Bhattacharyya, takes on this exciting and undeniably arduous task which certainly caters to both scholars who are well-versed in Rushdie and beginners who await their initiation. This comprehensive collection of essays and articles on Rushdie’s works brings into its purview an array of perspectives from eminent stalwarts (who are known for their various commentary on Rushdie, or on post/colonial, post/modern, Indian/English literatures, and so on) alongside newer critics/scholars emerging on the grid of literary and academic topologies. An extensive introduction written by one of the editors (Bhattacharyya), and a substantially revealing interview with a major critic of Rushdie (Timothy Brennan), methodically plots out the premises along the lines of which the anthology unravels as a significant appendage to the steadily expanding field of studies on Rushdie.

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Book Review: Statistics for Linguists: A Step-by-Step Guide for Novices

David Eddington’s book “Statistics for Linguists. A Step-by-Step Guide for Novices” presents a detailed account of the main statistical methods in linguistic analysis, by using the software SPSS 20. From its subtitle, it is clear that the book is intended for newbies who know little or nothing about both statistics and the IBM software SPSS. Moreover, even if graphs and figures refers to the 20th version of the software, in the Introduction the author states that it will work also for the closest versions, either slightly older or newer.

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Book Review: The Medusa Gaze in Contemporary Women’s Fiction: Petrifying, Maternal and Redemptive

Beginning with some quotes from this ovarian book The Medusa Gaze in Contemporary Women’s Fiction: Petrifying, Maternal and Redemptive by Gillian M.E. Alban:

Alban reflects throughout this book on the myriad ways women and girls are gazed upon within patriarchal cultures as well as examples of how women assert their right to look, stare, or claim an apotropaic gaze of power and anger …”. from the Foreword by Margaret Merisante, Ph.D., Feminist Comparative Mythologist.

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Book Review: Global Climate Change, Environment and Energy: Global Challenges and Opportunities to Global Stability

This book discusses global climate change by focusing on the interdependence between energy and the environment. According to the editor, the issue of global climate change needs an interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approach. Therefore, this book aims to identify the challenges and the necessary policy recommendations to overcome these challenges.

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Book Review: Antiquity in Popular Literature and Culture

This volume is a collection of essays which derive from a 2014 conference at the Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Poland. Together they seek, as Martin M. Winkler notes in his useful introduction, to demonstrate “the continuing presence of the past or, to put it slightly differently, the importance of the past in the present and, by extension, for the future” (p.xiii).

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