Friedrich Nietzsche’s Birthday – Cambridge Scholars Publishing

On the 15th of October, join Cambridge Scholars in marking the birthday of one of the most important philosophers ever to have lived – Friedrich Nietzsche. Born on this day in 1844 in the small town of Röcken in Germany, Nietzsche went on to become one of the towering figures of European philosophy towards the end of the nineteenth century. His concepts of slave morality, the will to power, and the Übermensch remain enormously influential in a number of academic disciplines, and his shadow continues to loom large in a number of debates within analytic and continental philosophy.

At Cambridge Scholars we are proud to be at the forefront of new, innovative interpretations of Nietzsche’s oeuvre. Not only do we publish the acclaimed Nietzsche Now series, but over the last twelve months we have published a number of books that have broken new ground in the study of his thinking and its contemporary relevance. We are therefore offering a 50% discount on five of these titles in October. Not only this, throughout the month our authors and Editorial Advisory Board members will be posting short articles on Nietzsche on our blog, the first of which can be read here. We were also delighted to sponsor the 24th International Conference of the Friedrich Nietzsche Society at Newcastle University last month, which you can read more about by clicking here.

To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code NIETZSCHE18 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 1st November 2018.


NietzscheEuropeanNihilismFriedrich Nietzsche and European Nihilism is a thorough study of Nietzsche’s thoughts on nihilism, the history of the concept, the different ways in which he tries to explain his ideas on nihilism, the way these ideas were received in the 20th century, and, ultimately, what these ideas should mean to us. It begins with an exploration of how we can understand the strange situation that Nietzsche, about 130 years ago, predicted that nihilism would break through one or two centuries from then, and why, despite the philosopher describing it as the greatest catastrophe that could befall humankind, we hardly seem to be aware of it, let alone be frightened by it. The book shows that most of us are still living within the old frameworks of faith, and, therefore, can hardly imagine what it would mean if the idea of God (as the summit and summary of all our epistemic, moral, and esthetic beliefs) would become unbelievable.


NietzscheandPhenomenologyNietzsche and Phenomenology brings together original essays on a wide variety of topics in the broad area of ‘Nietzsche and Phenomenology’. Some of these papers take a thematic approach, thinking through key issues that connect or divide Nietzsche and phenomenology, while others approach the conjunction of the title via an encounter between Nietzsche and one of the central figures of the phenomenological tradition or other relevant philosophers. In either case, new and often surpising connections are uncovered in many of these essays, while others bring out the profound differences and discontinuities between aspects of Nietzsche’s project and the projects of phenomenologists. Through both of these general tendencies, significant new insights are won that broaden our understanding both of the work of Nietzsche and of twentieth-century phenomenology.


0480503_nietzsche-and-transhumanism_300.jpegNietzsche and Transhumanism: Precursor or Enemy? deals with the question of whether Nietzsche can be seen as a precursor of transhumanism or not. Debates on the topic have existed for some years, particularly in the Journal of Evolution and Technology and The Agonist. This book combines existing papers, from these journals, with new material, to highlight some of the important issues surrounding this argument. The collection addresses a variety of issues to show whether or not there is a close connection between transhumanist concerns for progress and technology and Nietzsche’s ideas.

 


0404978_nietzsches-will-to-power_300Nietzsche’s Will to Power: Eagles, Lions, and Serpents represents a contribution to Nietzschean scholarship in its analysis of the concept of power as preliminary to addressing Nietzsche’s psychological version of will to power. It advances a fresh interpretation of will to power that connects it to the meaning of human life, and, in so doing, the author addresses major questions such as: What does will to power designate? What is its status, epistemologically and metaphysically? How persuasive is will to power as an explanation of human instincts and as the lynchpin of a way of life? As all human beings embody will to power, the book concludes that we should distinguish three varieties: robust, moderate, and attenuated will to power. Only by doing this, can we understand and evaluate will to power concretely.

 


0470734_the-places-of-god-in-an-age-of-re-embodiments_300.jpegIn an age of ecological decay, Western ontological and epistemological assumptions have to be revisited. The Places of God in an Age of Re-Embodiments: What is Culture? offers such a revision. It opens with a critical analysis of the paradigm of sustainable development and problematically situates it within the ecocidal trajectory of Western metaphysics. In search of some tools for examining the ecological conundrum, the book develops a pool of new categories of knowledge called “transpositions”. Though of cross-disciplinary nature, this work must be situated within the tradition of the post-Kantian critique of reason. To develop its own framework of analysis, it relies heavily upon Nietzsche’s oeuvre and that of part of his entourage. Major inputs also come from the work of the ecophilosopher of science Patrick Curry and ecofeminism at large.


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Is democracy doomed to lose its liberal core? New article by Daniel Dăianu

Daniel Dăianu, author of the recently published Emerging Europe and the Great Recession, has a new article in defence of liberalism and democracy at Eurozine. The book discusses and builds on some of the arguments made in his book. Please click here to read the article, and an indicative excerpt is below:

“There is evidence of mounting illiberal temptations in the industrialized world, in democratic societies. Are these temptations linked with temporary phenomena, in the ‘extraordinary times’ we are living through, or do they have deeper roots? An answer to this question begs an examination of trends in society and economy, of the emergence of new (unconventional) threats, and, not least, of failed public policies. The argument that ‘liberal democracy’ is on the wane is wrong to the extent that policies can be corrected, that citizens and elites alike do not lose trust in democratic values. It may also be true that, although democracy has a ‘liberal core’, it can also be driven by ‘illiberal’ components, and that the magnitude of the latter can vary. But for democracy to survive , its liberal core must be preserved.”


Daniel’s book is available now, and be purchased directly from Cambridge Scholars by clicking here.

International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples – Cambridge Scholars Publishing

On the 9th of August, Cambridge Scholars Publishing will be marking this years’ International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples. There are more than 370 million indigenous people in the world, and they comprise an overwhelming majority of the world’s estimated 7,000 languages and 5,000 cultures.

Yet the historical pressures of capitalism, colonialism, and globalisation have weighted heavily on the lives and futures of the world’s indigenous communities. These pressures have led to a surge in critical scholarship examining and critiquing the West’s relationship with indigenous peoples, and more recently scholars working from interdisciplinary post-, anti-, and de-colonial perspectives have attempted to highlight the importance of indigenous philosophies, ideas, and worldviews. At Cambridge Scholars, we are proud to contribute to this project not only by publishing the best scholarly work focusing on indigenous peoples and their lives, but by working with indigenous authors to emphasise their voices.

To mark this upcoming day, we are offering our readers a 50% discount on four of our most important titles that speak to this theme. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code INDIGENOUS18 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 1st September 2018.


 

0460680_and-therell-be-no-dancing_300Just prior to the federal election of 2007, the Australian government led by John Howard decreed the “Northern Territory National Emergency Response”, commonly known as the Intervention, officially in reaction to an investigation by the Northern Territory government into allegedly rampant sexual abuse and neglect of Indigenous children. Far from improving the living conditions of Indigenous Australians and children, the policies have resulted in disempowerment, widespread despair, criminalisation and higher unemployment. Fourteen essays by scholars from Australia and Germany examine (historical) contexts and discourses of the Intervention and subsequent policies impacting Indigenous Australia since 2007 from the perspective of diverse academic disciplines. They invite readers to engage in the debate about human rights, about Indigenous self-determination, and about the preservation of Indigenous culture.

0641746_community-practices-in-india_300As the seat of the origin of social work profession, the global North has dominated the production of social work knowledge while the global South has remained primarily the consumer of knowledge. This book is a ground-breaking collaboration by practitioners and academics from India to bring together indigenous knowledge in community organizing from the rich and vast base of experience existing within the country. It also presents an unprecedented example of the contribution made by the College of Social Work, Nirmala Niketan, Mumbai, in addressing societal injustice and leaves the reader with thought-provoking questions around the scope and role of academic institutions towards this end. This volume will engage social work students, practitioners and educators in a critical reflection on the key concepts, processes, strategies and tensions underlying community organizing practices within the Indian context.

0595277_decolonising-the-university_300At each particular historical moment, the university appears as a heavy and rigid structure resisting changes, whereas, throughout time, it has actually undergone profound transformation. Often such changes have been drastic and almost always provoked by factors external to the university, be they of a religious, political or economic nature. This book explores the nature and dynamics of the transformation that the university is undergoing today. It argues that some of the projects of reform currently under way are so radical that the question of the future of the university may well turn into the question of whether the university has a future. A specific feature of this inquiry is the realisation that questioning the future of the university involves questioning its past as well.

0707464_the-arts-and-indigenous-knowledge-systems-in-a-modernized-africa_300This collection derives from a conference held in Pretoria, South Africa, and discusses issues of indigenous knowledge systems (IKS) and the arts. It presents ideas about how to promote a deeper understanding of IKS within the arts, the development of IKS-arts research methodologies, and the protection and promotion of IKS in the arts. Knowledge, embedded in song, dance, folklore, design, architecture, theatre, and attire, and the visual arts can promote innovation and entrepreneurship, and it can improve communication. IKS, however, exists in a post-millennium, modernizing Africa. The book captures leading trends and ideas that could help to protect, promote, develop and affirm indigenous knowledge and systems, whilst also making room for ideas that do not necessarily oppose IKS, but encourage the modernization (not Westernization) of Africa.


To find out more about the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, please click here.

50th Anniversary of the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons Treaty – Cambridge Scholars Publishing

On the 1st of July 1968, exactly fifty years ago yesterday, the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons was opened for signature by the United Nations. In the preceding years, the horror of Hiroshima and the escalating tensions between the USA and the USSR over their stockpiling of nuclear weapons had led US President Dwight D. Eisenhower to declare in his famous 1953 Atoms for Peace speech that the new language of international relations was “the language of atomic warfare.” Eighteen nations from around the world, backed by the UN, subsequently came together and negotiated the terms of the treaty, and it remains in force today, signed by over 180 countries.

The key objectives of the treaty were to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons technology and encourage the development of clean, safe, nuclear energy. This is an endeavour common to governments, scientists, and experts from numerous other fields. At Cambridge Scholars, we are proud to contribute to this endeavour in our publication of titles spanning the Social, Physical, Health, and Life Sciences.

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the treaty, we are offering readers a parallel 50% discount on our titles on nuclear politics, history, and physics. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code NUCLEAR18 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 1st August 2018.


Picture of Henry A. Wallace’s Criticism of America’s Atomic Monopoly, 1945-1948Secretary of Commerce Henry A. Wallace was an earnest supporter of the Stimson Proposal, a disarmament proposal submitted to the Truman administration by then Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson immediately after World War II. This proposal suggested direct dialogue with the Soviets over control of the newly-released atomic energy used against Japan in August 1945. This book illustrates that Wallace’s ideas of international atomic controls with Soviet partnership – a position embraced by atomic scientists – could prevent a postwar nuclear proliferation. Amazingly, Wallace daringly made this historic attempt and kept to his vision.


Picture of The Divided Korean PeninsulaIn the West, interest about Korea is often limited to its unnatural division and the peculiar regime in the North of the Peninsula. However, its culture is rich, its history a thousand years-old, its land populous, and its economy spectacularly growing. How is it possible that such a country, a key figure in the recent history of Asia would only call to mind advanced technology or nuclear threat? This book is drawn from the personal experiences of the author, who lived in South Korea and experienced it two different times, in 2000 and 2010, and had the possibility of going back in 2017.


Picture of Magnetic and Electric ResonanceThis book is devoted to a quasi-classical treatment of quantum transitions, with an emphasis on nuclear magnetic resonance, nuclear quadrupole resonance and electric dipolar resonance. The method described here is based on the quasi-classical description of condensed matter, and makes use of the equation of motion of harmonic oscillators with external forces. In addition to known results in magnetic resonance, the book also presents parametric resonance for electric dipoles and dipolar interaction which may lead to spontaneous electric polarization. Overall, it presents a less known but important aspect of quasi-classical approximation to quantum-mechanical motion.


To find out more about Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, please click here.

Book of the Month – July 2018

Our July Book of the Month is Daughters of the Nile: Egyptian Women Changing Their World, edited by Samia I. Spencer.

Picture of Daughters of the NileWe hear much about Egyptian queens and princesses in popular culture. From the glistening figure of Cleopatra, whose legacy survives in countless forms of contemporary art, theatre, and literature, to the goddess Isis, worshipped by Egyptians and Greeks alike for her solemn role shepherding souls to the afterlife, ancient Egyptian history is awash with women. Yet in the modern age, we hear far more of Gamal Abdel Nasser, founder of contemporary Egypt, and Hosni Mubarak, who was famously deposed in the Arab Spring. This book asks a simple question: what of ordinary Egyptian women, and how do they navigate and transform both their country and the world? Daughters of the Nile: Egyptian Women Changing Their World is the vivid and timely story of the lives and experiences of modern Egyptian women – told from their own perspective in a reflective and passionate way.

To find out more, please click here to read a sample extract and contents page.


We are offering all of our readers a generous 60% discount on this book throughout July. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code BOMJUL18 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 1st August 2018.

Please see below for highlights of the praise this book has been receiving from academics, journalists, and government officials alike:

“The vividly narrated chapters, all in the first-person, hold many memorable phrases and much candour. The story in each becomes not only that of the individual woman narrating her experience but also the history of a society and a country. Through the eyes and documents of these women, we see pressing Egyptian issues coming to the fore. […] For those interested in Egypt or women’s progress, or those who enjoy engaging and well-written autobiography, this book is a must.”

–Aziza Sami, Al-Ahram Weekly, 03.03.2017

“This book is long overdue. It is high time that modern Egyptian women stand side-by-side with their brilliant ancestors.”

–Yvette Roudy, France’s Minister of Women’s Rights (1981-1986)

“This outstanding book is a must-read. Many influential Egyptians share personal, telling stories about their achievements, shattering stale myths about Egyptian women. In their marvelously detailed narratives, they strive to make the world a better place, resulting in a much-needed Egyptian humanity. Their stories warmed my heart; so much so that I want to meet and thank each and every one of them for their passion, wit and courage.”

–Jack G Shaheen, Author of Reel Bad Arabs: How Hollywood Vilifies a People

“Working on Rule of Law programs, in Egypt and Jordan, with judges from the region, I observed first-hand the valuable contribution women make to the discussion of today’s important issues. So for me, the professional achievements chronicled in this book, although remarkable are not surprising. Narratives that mothers and daughters can read together, and that all of us can admire. What fine examples the authors set for women everywhere!”

–Justice Joseph P. Nadeau, New Hampshire Supreme Court (Retired)

“Stereotypes are unidimensional stories about a category of other, largely devoid of fact. The strongest antidote to stereotyping are stories that offer counter-narratives about real people living rich, full lives of substance. This book is a wonderful example of just such counter-narratives.”

–Mary Ellen Kondrat, Dean and Retired Professor, University of Kansas School of Social Welfare

“This book is a stark and important reminder of the power of women, their accomplishments against many odds, and their resilience to overcome, lead, and be a force to reckon with in their country and beyond. Egyptian women have a strong and rich tradition of leadership, and this is yet another example of their strength—an excellent and inspiring read.”

–Mohammad Naciri Regional Director, Arab States Regional Office, UN Women, Cairo, Egypt


Editorial Advisory Board’s ‘Recommended Read’ – July 2018

This month, our Editorial Advisory Board member Dr Edith Bruder has chosen her ‘Recommended Read’: a book published in December 2016 by Tudor Parfitt and Netanel Fisher. Edith is a research associate at the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) and a research fellow at the University of South Africa. A French ethnologist with a multi-disciplinary background in the history of art and clinical psychology, she has researched and published widely on the history and the contemporary phenomena of Jewish practices across sub-Saharan Africa, Judaising movements, forgotten diasporas, contemporary diasporas and particular Jewish identities. Her books include Black Jews, Les Juifs noirs d’Afrique et le mythe des Tribus perdues (Albin Michel 2014), co-editor of African Zion, Studies in Black Judaism (Cambridge Scholars Publishing 2012) and African Journeys to Judaism (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, forthcoming 2018)

We are offering all of our readers a 50% discount on Edith’s choice. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code EABJUL18 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 1st August 2018.


Dr Edith Bruder’s ‘Recommended Read’:

Becoming Jewish: New Jews and Emerging Jewish Communities in a Globalized World

Editors: Tudor Parfitt and Netanel Fisher

One of the most striking contemporary religious phenomena is the world-wide fascination with Judaism. Traditionally, few non-Jews converted to the Jewish faith, but today millions are converting to Judaism In this volume, leading scholars of issues related to conversion, Judaising movements and Judaism as a New Religious Movement discuss and explain this global movement towards identification with the Jewish people, from Germany and Poland to China and Nigeria.


Picture of Becoming Jewish“Tudor Parfitt and Netanel Fisher’s captivating book on the emergence of new Jewish identities in the globalized world is resolutely looking forward to the future. The book is a courageous adventure in transnational histories, cultural crossbreeding, and the development of Jewish identity in the twentieth century. It refers to a remarkable phenomenon that has been taking place over several decades:  in various countries, a vast number of individuals or groups have chosen to become part of the Jewish people and have acquainted themselves with Jewish tradition and legends in diverse circumstances and contexts.

In their chapters, leading scholars from social and religious sciences delineate the various profiles of ‘joiners’ to Judaism. In the vast scope of their methodological approach, one of the distinguishing features of the book, they rise unavoidable questions about identity, “authentic” Jewishness, and citizenship in Israel: Who is a Jew… versus a non-Jew? What is Judaism?

This book constitutes a very valuable and worthwhile resource. What it demonstrates clearly is that Judaism and Jewishness are going through very profound changes in our time. It is not surprising that different disciplines based on different criteria and methods of interpretation may reach different conclusions on the same subject—it appears that the story is just beginning to unfold.”


For further information on Dr Bruder, please click here.