Book Announcement: Cultural Heritage in a Comparative Approach: In the Name of Aphrodite

Cultural Heritage in a Comparative Approach: In the Name of Aphrodite now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443873116
Hardback, pp140, £58.99 / $99.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Cultural Heritage in a Comparative Approach: In the Name of Aphrodite by Andrea Ragusa.

Despite the increasing focus from juridical and social sciences perspectives, cultural heritage remains a subject insufficiently considered from a historical point of view. Based on a comparative approach, looking at a variety of experiences developed for the management of cultural heritage since the emergence of the protectionist movement, this book analyses UNESCO cultural heritage legislation with regards to the socio-anthropological evolution of the concept of cultural heritage.
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Book Announcement: Rethinking Comparison in Archaeology

Rethinking Comparison in Archaeology now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443872850
Hardback, pp215, £61.99 / $104.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Rethinking Comparison in Archaeology, edited by Ana Vale, Joana Alves-Ferreira and Irene Garcia Rovira.

Although comparative exercises are used or applied both explicitly and implicitly in a large number of archaeological publications, they are often uncritically taken for granted. As such, the authors of this book reflect on comparison as a core theme in archaeology from different perspectives, and different theoretical and practical backgrounds. The contributors come from different universities and research contexts, and approach themes and objects from Prehistory to the Early Middle Ages, presenting case studies from Western Europe, the Near East and Latin America. The chapters here also relate archaeology with other disciplines, like art studies, photography, cinema, computer sciences and anthropology, and will be of interest to a wide range of readers, not only archaeologists and those interested in the area of social sciences, but for all those interested in how we construct the past today.
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Book Announcement: Insularity, Identity and Epigraphy in the Roman World

Insularity, Identity and Epigraphy in the Roman World now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443847049
Hardback, pp348, £64.99 / $109.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Insularity, Identity and Epigraphy in the Roman World, edited by Javier Velaza.

This book explores the subject of islands, their essence and identity, their isolation and their relationships in the Ancient world. It investigates Greek and Roman concepts of insularity, and their practical consequences for the political, economic and social life of the Empire. The contributions examine whether being related to an island was an externally or internally distinctive feature, and whether a tension between insularity and globalisation can be detected in this period. The book also looks at whether there is an insular material culture, an island-based approach to sacredness, or an island-based category of epigraphy. Continue reading

Ancient Inscriptions Show Life Once Flourished in Jordan’s ‘Black Desert’

Thousands of inscriptions and petroglyphs dating back around 2,000 years have been discovered in the Jebel Qurma region of Jordan’s Black Desert. They tell of a time when the now-desolate landscape was teeming with life.

“Nowadays, the Jebel Qurma area, and the Black Desert in general, is a highly inhospitable area, very arid and difficult to cross,” said Peter Akkermans, a professor at Leiden University in the Netherlands who leads the Jebel Qurma Archaeological Landscape Project. Photos the team took of the modern-day landscape show little water, vegetation or wildlife.

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