Editorial Advisory Board’s ‘Recommended Read’ – February 2019

For February’s Recommended Read, our Editorial Advisory Board member Dr Martina Tanga has chosen: Museums and Public Art?: an assemblage of essays that exhibit the connections and collaborations between museums and public art.

Martina is a contemporary art historian and curator, specializing in Italian 20th century art. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, her research interests focus on art that engages with social concerns, feminism, the built environment, and audience participation. She has published widely, having written several exhibition reviews for publications like Art Papers, penned art object entries for museum catalogues, and authored several essays based on her research that have appeared in a number of academic anthologies.

We are offering all of our readers a 50% discount on Martina’s choice. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code EABFEB19 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 11th March 2019.


Dr Martina Tanga’s ‘Recommended Read’:

Museums and Public Art?

Editors: Cher Krause Knight, Harriet F. Senie

This is the first book to contextualize the collaborations between museums and public art through a range of essays marked by their coherence of topical focus, written by leading and emerging scholars and artists. It represents a major contribution to the field of art history in general, will be of significant interest to those studying and working in the domain of public art and museums.


“While the question mark in the book’s title might lead readers to believe that museums and public art are antithetical, the compilation of essays point, instead, to the many instances when museums and public art projects have found common ground, shared the same space, developed the same audiences, sought the same goals, or settled on a mutual benefit. Moreover, many of the case studies examined blur the boundaries between public art—defined as art located in open, often urban, spaces—and museums—described as enclosed institutions whose function is the display of art—so that distinctions constructively, and productively, break down.

At the center of the book is a discussion of what is public; how might we reconcile, for example, the public-ness of museums and the private-ness of public space? Public art consistently engages with the politics of space, how democratic is the street, and what intangible barriers there may be to audiences. Many authors address the issue of inside and outside, and the gray space in between, in this anthology. Just as location is important, so are audiences, and what, or better, who is the public in museums and for art outside is another grounding theme of this compendium. A highlight comes from thinking about the collaboration between the museum’s educational mission and its alignment with the tenets of public art. They are both concerned with engaging audiences, building communities, and challenging power. Another critical strain is the tension between public good and private interests, which in reality, affect both museums’ operations and the sphere of public art. Unfortunately, today, this is one of major—at times inconspicuous—questions regarding the production of culture, of which museums and public art are both embroiled within. On a positive note, the book suggests that an avenue ripe for future exploration is the integration of the museum and public art through the nexus of social practice, a dialogical model of art making that centers on audiences. This approach would dismantle the distinctions of site and foreground the public, bringing people together in an enriching experience.”


For further information on Dr Martina Tanga, please click here.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s