Ancient Rome in the Era of Trajan – Cambridge Scholars Publishing

This August, Cambridge Scholars is marking the 1900th anniversary of the death of the Roman emperor Trajan. Trajan was the first of Rome’s emperors to have been born outside Italy (in Spain) and under whom the empire reached its greatest extent before his death in August 117 CE. In his biography of the Spanish-born emperor, Dr Julian Bennett writes that “to Trajan … belongs the praise for bringing the developing principate to its zenith, and the embryonic imperium to its nascence.”

Academic scholarship on the ancient world is continually evolving, and to commemorate the 1900th anniversary of the death of Trajan, we are pleased to offer our readers a 50% discount on 4 of our newest studies on the Roman empire. To find out more about each title, click on the image.

To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code TRAJAN17 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 31st August 2017.


The “spatial turn” of the 1990s has inspired many academics to re-evaluate the importance of space and time within their own disciplines and to engage in productive dialogue with other disciplines whose spatial focus intersects with their own. Close Relations: Spaces of Greek and Roman Theatre applies insights and approaches generated by the “spatial turn” to Greek and Roman theatre. The title evokes the “close relations” that exist between the many aspects and notions of space-time and their complex interweaving, between the disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches that are needed to understand complex spatial phenomena, between notions of space in general and those of theatrical space, and between Greek and Roman theatre as it existed in antiquity and as it has been “received,” interpreted, and transformed throughout history ever since.


Insularity, Identity and Epigraphy in the Roman World explores the subject of islands, their essence and identity, their isolation and their relationships in the Ancient world. It investigates Greek and Roman concepts of insularity, and their practical consequences for the political, economic and social life of the Empire. The contributions examine whether being related to an island was an externally or internally distinctive feature, and whether a tension between insularity and globalisation can be detected in this period. The book also looks at whether there is an insular material culture, an island-based approach to sacredness, or an island-based category of epigraphy.


Questions on identity have been often the main focus of Classical Studies. The starting point of Self-Presentation and Identity in the Roman World is that identity is not a monolithic idea. Instead of exploring what exactly ‘identity’ is, the contributors here examine how the concept of ‘self-presentation’ can facilitate our understanding of how individuals present their identities. Moreover, the interpretation of the means and character of this self-presentation itself enables more general conclusions to be drawn. Topics covered in this volume include identities shaped through the self-presentation of authors in Latin literature, and explorations on epigraphy and historical analyses. Overall, using the theme of self-presentation, the contributors offer a glimpse into various subjects and suggest new ways for students and scholars to approach the different forms of individual and communal identities.


Varius is the nomen of the Roman emperor misnamed Elagabalus or Heliogabalus. These are names of the Syrian sun god Elagabal, whose high priest Varius was while emperor. There is no evidence that he was ever so called when alive. Thus named, his posthumous legendary or mythical avatar thrives, in academic prose and popular imagination, as a Semitic monster of cruelty, depravity, fanaticism, mockery and extravagance. Recently, this monster has metamorphosed into an anarchist saint and martyr of gay liberation. Varian Studies Volume One: Varius explores the historical individual behind Elagabalus and Heliogabalus and serves to rescue Varius for history from eighteen centuries spent in fantasy and fiction.

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