Book Announcement: Science, Public Health and Nation-Building in Soekarno-Era Indonesia

Science, Public Health and Nation-Building in Soekarno-Era Indonesia now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443886543
Hardback, pp240, £61.99 / $105.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Science, Public Health and Nation-Building in Soekarno-Era Indonesia, by Vivek Neelakantan.

In 1949, the newly-independent Indonesia inherited a health system that was devastated by three-and-a-half years of Japanese occupation and four years of revolutionary struggle against the Dutch. Additionally, the country had to cope with the resurgence of epidemic and endemic diseases. The Ministry of Health had initiated a number of symbolic public health initiatives – both during the Indonesian Revolution (1945 to 1949) and the early 1950s – resulting in a noticeable decline of mortality. These initiatives fuelled the newly-independent nation’s confidence because they demonstrated to the international community that Indonesia was capable of standing on its own feet.

Unfortunately, by the mid-1950s, Indonesia’s public health program faltered due to a constellation of factors attributed to the political tensions between Java and the Outer Islands, administrative problems, corruption, and rampant inflation. The optimism that characterised the early years of independence gave way to despair. The Soekarno era could, therefore, be interpreted as the era of bold plans but unfulfilled aspirations in Indonesian public health. Based on extensive archival research and a close reading of Indonesian primary sources, this book provides a nuanced account of the inner tensions in Indonesian public health during the twentieth century – between a narrow biomedical approach that emphasised disease eradication, and a holistic approach that linked public health to practical concerns of nation-building.

To read a full summary of the book and to read a 30-page sample extract, which includes the table of contents, please visit the following link:

http://www.cambridgescholars.com/science-public-health-and-nation-building-in-soekarno-era-indonesia


All Cambridge Scholars authors and contributors are entitled to a 40% discount on this title, to claim this simply enter the author discount code on the My Order page after adding the book to your basket from the link above. For further information about the author discount, please contact admin@cambridgescholars.com.


Science, Public Health and Nation-Building in Soekarno-Era Indonesia can be purchased directly from Cambridge Scholars, through Amazon and other online retailers, or through our global network of distributors. Our partners include Bertram, Gardners, Baker & Taylor, Ingram, YBP, Inspirees and MHM Limited. An e-book version will be available for purchase through the Google Play store in due course.

For further information on placing an order for this title, please contact orders@cambridgescholars.com.

About the Author

Vivek Neelakantan received a PhD in History of Medicine from the University of Sydney, Australia, in 2014. His PhD thesis – based extensively on archival research at the WHO and in Indonesia – critically examined Indonesia’s relations with the WHO during the Cold War and the appropriation and transformation of social medicine by nationalist physicians. He is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Indian Institute of Technology Madras (IITM). His current research, supported by a Rockefeller Foundation Grant-In-Aid, and a grant from the Truman Library, examines the centrality of medicine to postcolonial science in Indonesia and the Philippines.

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