International Women’s Day 2017 – Cambridge Scholars Publishing

This March, Cambridge Scholars are proud to support International Women’s Day, which this year has #BeBoldForChange as its campaign theme. The World Economic Forum predicts that the gender gap won’t close until 2186 at its current rate, but International Women’s Day can be an important catalyst for driving greater change towards gender parity around the world.

internationalwomensday-portraitThis year the campaign theme of International Women’s Day is #BeBoldForChange. Call on the masses or call on yourself to help forge a better working world – a more gender inclusive world. You can submit your #BeBoldForChange action via the IWD website.

Last year, organizations and individuals around the world supported the #PledgeForParity campaign and committed to help women and girls achieve their ambitions; challenge conscious and unconscious bias; call for gender-balanced leadership; value women and men’s contributions equally; and create inclusive flexible cultures. From awareness raising to concrete action, organizations rallied their people to pledge support to help forge gender parity on International Women’s Day (IWD) and beyond.

To mark International Women’s Day, we are offering our readers a 50% discount on 4 of our best-selling titles in the field of Women’s Studies. To find out more about each title, click on the link.

To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code IWD17 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 2nd April 2017.


148829469216082Questions that concern gender and violence against women have been placed firmly on the agenda of interdisciplinary research within the humanities in recent years. Gender-based violence against women has increased exponentially in South Africa and in other countries on the African continent, particularly those with a history of political conflict. A Reflexive Inquiry into Gender Research brings together an interdisciplinary group of scholars and scholar-activists to explore new terrains of knowledge production, interrogating the connection between the intellectual project of this kind of research and the process of its production. Overall, this book represents an important combination of scholarly insights, and provides multiple reflections about practical aspects of conducting gender research in the African context. The work of the contributors to the volume is situated within a post-structural feminist agenda, and, collectively, the chapters link scholarship and activism in a way that pursues a social change agenda in research on gender and gender-based violence.


148829469216083During China’s “socio-economic transition period”, stretching from 1978 to the present day, the nation’s social structure underwent enormous changes, including the situation of Chinese women. Over recent decades, more equalitarian policies have made a great deal of difference, not only to women’s self-identification, but also to their social milieu. However, the female employment rate has gradually declined since the economic reforms began, meaning this period has had a major impact on the social status and conditions of Chinese women. These social transformations and differences between the genders have provided an unusual opportunity for scholars and researchers who are interested in social change. As such, Class and Gender examines the social structure of contemporary China, exploring how resources are distributed among the different social strata, and how these strata have transformed with the economic reforms and development. This title also allows readers to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the current Chinese social structure, and how it has transformed, as well as its influence on gender differentiation.


0397943_daughters-of-the-nile_300Daughters of the Nile seeks to highlight Egyptian women that the media have overlooked and ignored. It focuses on a sample of 38 pioneers, ground-breakers, and achievers in nearly all professions. Their successes in Egypt and elsewhere have been recognized and honoured by some of the highest national and international institutions and governments. Forgotten or unknown habits, practices, and historical events occurring in the twentieth century, both in Egypt and other parts of the globe, are also discussed in these stories. The objective of the book is three-pronged. It breaks the monolithic and unflattering stereotype of contemporary Egyptian women as victims, uneducated and uncivilized, dominated by men. The second is to make the world aware of modern Egyptian champions who are improving the quality of life in the societies and broader environments in which they live and work. The third purpose is to provide positive role models for new generations of women in Egypt and beyond, to inspire them to set their goals very high despite the obstacles they may encounter, and show them that the sky is not the limit.


0341076_gender-and-work_300Recent years have witnessed growing scholarly interest in efforts to advance women’s work and in exploring the implicit obstacles to gender equity – such as the “glass floor,” “glass ceiling,” and “glass walls” – that have persisted in most career fields. This interdisciplinary collection contributes to this new field of knowledge by curating scholarly essays and current research on gendered work environments and all the nuanced meanings of “work” in the context of feminism and gender equality. The chapters in Gender and Work represent some of the most outstanding papers presented at the Women and Gender Conference held at the University of South Dakota on April 9–10, 2015. The unifying focus of this collection is on the work-related intersections of gender, race, and class, which are investigated through a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches. Some of the essays provide historical and literary contexts for contemporary issues. Others use social-scientific approaches to identify strategies for making the contemporary Western workplace more humane and inclusive to women and other disadvantaged members of society.

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