Human Rights Day 2016 – Cambridge Scholars Publishing

On 10th December, people around the world will come together to observe Human Rights Day. At Cambridge Scholars we are pleased to support this important annual event, as continued respect for human rights is a growing concern in the globalised modern world.

en_banner-medHuman Rights Day is observed on 10th December every year. It commemorates the day on which, in 1948, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. This year, Human Rights Day calls on everyone to stand up for someone’s rights! Many of us are fearful about the way the world is heading. Disrespect for basic human rights continues to be wide-spread in all parts of the globe. Extremist movements subject people to horrific violence. Messages of intolerance and hatred prey on our fears. Humane values are under attack. We must reaffirm our common humanity. Wherever we are, we can make a real difference: in the street, in school, at work, in public transport, in the voting booth, on social media.

To mark Human Rights Day, we are offering our readers a 50% discount on four of our most relevant titles.

Images and Human Rights explores issues of creation, distribution, and control of images through official and unofficial sources, asking what impact that has had on human rights and what the ethical implications are. The volume includes research from healthcare advocates, human rights scholars and activists, photographers, and visual anthropologists who see a need for more careful contextual interpretation of images in global and local settings. It represents diverse forms of scholarship and the ever-changing field of research methodologies, and it examines how human rights issues take advantage of visual methodologies and how the visual works to communicate these issues with the public. As such, this collection will be useful for researchers studying in the fields of visual culture and human rights.

The 1980s saw one of the largest social movements in US history, as activists fought to change the Reagan Administration’s policy of supporting right-ring terror and oligarchy in Central America. Despite the size and diversity of the movement, however, it remains understudied. Fight and Flight examines the campaigns of three US NGOs, namely Amnesty International USA, the National Lawyers Guild, and the Committee in Solidarity with the People of El Salvador. By analysing the ways in which the NGOs ameliorated the effects of human rights violations in Central America, primarily through their refugee assistance programs, this research demonstrates that the movement was more effective than is generally reflected in the existing literature. Of particular interest for academic students of human rights and social movements, as well as activists interested in strategies of social change, this book offers a nuanced reading of a critical movement for human rights and international justice.

The primary concern of Private Military and Security Companies is the application of International Humanitarian Law and International Human Rights Law in addressing the business conduct of Private Military and Security Companies (PMSCs) during armed conflicts, as well as state responsibility for human rights violations and current attempts at international regulation. The book discusses four interconnected themes. First, it differentiates private contractors from mercenaries, presenting an historical overview of private violence. Second, it situates PMSCs’ employees under the legal status of civilian or combatant. It then investigates the existing law on state responsibility and what sort of responsibility companies and their employees can face. Finally, the book explores current developments on regulation within the industry, on national, regional and international levels.

Repressive regimes, regardless of their nature and geographic location, have a destructive and dehumanizing effect on people’s lives. Oppression and political violence shatter victims’ identities, their relationships, communities and the meaning of their world as a safe and coherent place. However, while some people suffer traumatising long term effects, others become stronger and more resilient, able to rebuild their lives in the aftermath of tragedy. Reconstructing Trauma and Meaning is an invitation to revisit, bear witness and listen to the stories of suffering and healing of survivors of apartheid repression in South Africa. This work is an exploration of the life trajectories of former victims of gross human rights violations during apartheid and their creative ways of reconstructing meaning after trauma. Their life narratives, shaped by social, political and cultural realities, are a valuable contribution to the collective memory of the nation, as an intrinsic part of the continuous process of reconciliation and transformation in South Africa.


To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code HUMAN16 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 3rd January 2017.


To find out more about Human Rights Day, please click here.


 

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