Book Announcement: Challenges of Anglophone Language(s), Literatures and Cultures

Challenges of Anglophone Language(s), Literatures and Cultures now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443817516
Hardback, pp340, £68.99 / $117.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Challenges of Anglophone Language(s), Literatures and Cultures by Pavlina Radia.

This book explores scholarly challenges within the fields of Anglophone language, literature, and culture. The section focusing on language details issues falling within two areas: namely, language contact and the language-culture relationship, and stylistic and syntactic perspectives on the English language. The literature part investigates twentieth-century American, English, and Australian literature, dealing with both poetry and prose and discussing topics of identity, gender, metafiction, postmodern conditions, and other relevant theoretical issues in contemporary literature. The culture part treats theoretical approaches in cultural studies that are vital in today’s cultural context, especially in Central European universities, the Irish language and culture, and contemporary cultural phenomena inspired by the growing ubiquity of technological intrusions into various fields of cultural production. Continue reading

Book Announcement: Essays on Unfamiliar Travel-Writing: Off the Beaten Track

Essays on Unfamiliar Travel-Writing: Off the Beaten Track now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443831697
Hardback, pp260, £52.99 / $90.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Essays on Unfamiliar Travel-Writing: Off the Beaten Track by John Butler.

This book comprises a number of essays on travel-narratives which are somewhat unknown to the general reader. They include writing by people who travelled from the East to the West, as well as those going the usual way. The travellers include a seventeenth-century accountant, a Persian shah, an Indian rajah and a Hawaiian king, as well as an Irish doctor, an American journalist and a Japanese poet. The book presents these travellers in an informal manner, although there are discussions about identity, “otherness” and stereotyping as they are displayed in the narratives. The book will appeal to students and academics, as well as the general reader. Continue reading

Book Announcement: Helen Kemp Frye’s Writings on Art

Helen Kemp Frye’s Writings on Art now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443836593
Hardback, pp115, £45.99 / $78.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Helen Kemp Frye’s Writings on Art, edited by Robert D. Denham.

Helen Kemp Frye (1910–1986) was an accomplished artist and musician, and she was also the wife of the distinguished Canadian literary critic, Northrop Frye. During the 1940s and 1950s, she played an important role in art education, particularly with the programs at the Art Gallery of Toronto, and even more particularly with art education for children. Her writings on art, collected in this volume, give voice to a very creative individual whose contributions to the cultural life of Ontario are in danger of being forgotten. Continue reading

Book Review: The Trinidad Dougla: Identity, Ethnicity and Lexical Choice

The Dougla (plural: Douglas) is the offspring of the following seven combinations of parents: African mother and Indian father; African father and Indian mother; African mother and Dougla father; African father and Dougla mother; Indian mother and Dougla father; Indian father and Dougla mother; and Dougla mother and Dougla father. The Trinidad Dougla is the offspring of these combinations of parents in Trinidad. Douglas constitute a social group, and for her PhD dissertation Dr. Regis researched how the choice of 103 lexical items by six of them as they interacted with people in their different partial social networks contributes to the formation of their ethnic identity. She has gone further when converting her study into this book, in part to make it more easily accessible to scholars, researchers, and culture enthusiasts alike.

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Kissinger and the Invasion of Cyprus: Diplomacy in the Eastern Mediterranean now available in paperback

Paperback edition of Kissinger and the Invasion of Cyprus: Diplomacy in the Eastern Mediterranean now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443831796
Paperback, pp230, £34.99 / $59.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the paperback release of Kissinger and the Invasion of Cyprus: Diplomacy in the Eastern Mediterranean by William Mallinson.

Can Henry Kissinger be described as a serious statesman who altered the course of relations between states? Or was he a shallow impersonator of those whom he admired, and a geopolitical engineer who treated people as collateral fodder, reducing morality to the status of a strategic and tactical tool? Using the story of Kissinger’s behaviour over Cyprus, backed up by recently revealed government documents, many critical, William Mallinson, former diplomat and leading authority on Cyprus’ history, provides an incisive analysis and evaluation of Kissinger’s approach, revealing a man who appears to have considered political strategy more important than law and ethics. Continue reading

Book Announcement: Uniting Regions and Nations through the Looking Glass of Literature

Uniting Regions and Nations through the Looking Glass of Literature now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443817271
Hardback, pp172, £45.99 / $78.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of Uniting Regions and Nations through the Looking Glass of Literature by Karoline Szatek-Tudor.

This volume of essays emphasizes the common theme that bodies of water may segregate, but, ironically, also unite nations and their readers through the literature that authors from various countries produce. It reveals the importance of valuing literature that, over time, has travelled down bubbling streams, across lakes, along ocean waves, and white-water rivers because fiction, drama, and poetry know neither actual nor artificial boundaries, and, therefore, they cross-fertilize, and even transform, beliefs, practices, and roles across cultures.
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